Modern Languages student takes German dictionary
UCAS Code
R902
Mode of Study
Full-time with language year abroad
Duration
4 years full-time with language year abroad
Start Date
September 2020

Overview

Do you have an interest in languages and the desire to develop your linguistic skills to a professional level? Do you want to spend a year abroad, learning more about the culture and languages of another country?

This BA (Hons) Modern Languages degree course immerses you in 1-3 languages of your choice, while imparting the cultural knowledge and vocational skills that will make you a sought after professional in multiple countries.

Whether you’re experienced in speaking multiple languages or need to learn your chosen language from scratch, we’ll take your enthusiasm and mould you into a confident linguistic expert.

What you'll experience

On this Modern Languages course, you'll:

  • study 1 language from French, German or Spanish

or:

  • study 2 languages from French, German, Spanish, Italian (beginners level only) or Mandarin (beginners level only)

To study 2 languages, you'll need to have taken French, German or Spanish at A level and continue studying your A level language.

You can also:

  • Use our professional-grade conference interpreting suite and language labs, where you can manipulate video, sound, text and Internet sources
  • Immerse yourself in the cultures of the countries where your chosen languages are spoken – in the classroom and on your work or study placement abroad in year 3
  • Test your language skills in simulations, scenario exercises, television broadcasts and debates
  • Fast-track to a teaching career with an optional Initial Teacher Training pathway, which includes a £9,000 bursary Qualified Teacher Status on completion of the final year of your degree

Optional pathway

Interested in pairing your study of languages with psychology? Expand your degree with an optional pathway into psychology. It'll lead to the award of BA (Hons) Modern Languages with Psychology at the end of the course.

Careers and opportunities

When you finish the course, our careers and employability service can help you find a job that puts your skills to work in the industry.

What can you do with a Modern Languages degree?

With language skills continuing to be in high demand in many industries, previous students have gone on to work in fields such as:

  • translation and interpreting
  • marketing
  • journalism and the media
  • international management
  • teaching
  • tourism
  • finance

What jobs can you do with a Modern Languages degree?

Roles our graduates have taken on include:

  • bilingual consultant
  • multilingual project coordinator translator
  • teacher
  • translator/interpreter
  • diplomat
  • journalist
  • tourist guide
  • market analyst

Other graduates have continued their studies at postgraduate level or set up successful businesses with help and support from the University.

After you graduate, you can get help, advice and support for up to 5 years from our Careers and Employability service as you advance in your career.

I had the most fantastic experience on this course. I went to study abroad as part of the Erasmus+ scheme, which completed my course perfectly and initiated the path into my career. It was the most perfect opportunity.

Lauren Cooper , BA Hons Combined Modern Languages student

What you'll study on this BA (Hons) Modern Languages degree

Each module on this course is worth a certain number of credits.

In each year, you need to study modules worth a total of 120 credits. For example, 4 modules worth 20 credits and 1 module worth 40 credits.

Year 1

Core modules

What you'll do

You'll critically engage with how categories such as ethnicity, linguistic group or shared values can be selectively used, and in some cases created, to generate a 'national identity' for political, social and/or economic expediency. You'll also look at evidence that the nation-state is in decline, the growing role of international and supranational organisations, and the reassertion of 'regional' identities.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Demonstrate a familiarity with key theories of nationalism
  • Describe the factors that have played a role in nation-building
  • Familiarise yourself with a range of French (and Francophone), German, Spanish (and Latin American) and European illustrative examples
  • Locate case studies drawn from European contexts in theories of nationalism and nation-building
  • Explain the key impacts of globalisation on the nation-state
Teaching activities
  • 8 x 1-hour lecture
  • 15 x 2-hour seminars
  • 8 x 1-hour practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 154 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 15-minute oral assessment and presentation (20% of final mark)
  • a 1,000-word written assignment (20% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll carry out a small-scale investigation into aspects of contemporary spoken language and work collaboratively to carry out research and present your findings in an oral presentation. In addition to writing an individual report, you’ll critically reflect on the process of carrying out research and how the skills you gained could be used in a professional context.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Assess your own learning needs and develop strategies for addressing weaknesses in learning
  • Read and organise points to form a coherent and cohesive argument on a discipline-related topic
  • Collect and analyse short extracts of authentic spoken data
  • Report collaboratively on the findings of your research project in a group presentation
  • Critically reflect on the process of carrying out research, working collaboratively and the role of research in potential careers
  • Produce a written report of the findings including potential modifications as well as reference to existing research
Teaching activities
  • 23 x 2-hour seminars
  • 6 x 1-hour tutorials
  • 17 x 1-hour practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 131 hours studying independently. This is around 8 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,500-word written assignment (20% of final mark)
  • a 15-minute oral assessment and presentation (20% of final mark)
  • a 4,000-word portfolio project (60% of final mark)

Optional modules

What you'll do

This module maps to the A1 and A2 levels of the Council of Europe Common European Framework for Languages. You'll go to seminars in language labs based on written and audio texts, workshops and activities support by resources on our virtual learning environment (VLE).

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Through listening, get information about various topics from authentic audio and video sources
  • Communicate simply with formal and informal registers, using the target language (TL) with an appropriate degree of grammatical accuracy and cultural competence.
  • Get information about daily activities from traditional and electronic sources
  • Produce written information that describes and comments on events with an appropriate degree of grammatical accuracy and cultural competence.
  • Use various resources, and begin to deploy proactive, independent and collaborative learning strategies
Teaching activities
  • 23 x 2-hour seminars
  • 23 x 1-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 131 hours studying independently. This is around 8 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 40-minute in-class test (25% of final mark)
  • a 4-minute oral presentation (25% of final mark)
  • a 1-hour written exam (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

This module maps to the A1 and A2 levels of the Council of Europe Common European Framework for Languages. You'll go to seminars in language labs based on written and audio texts, workshops and activities support by resources on our virtual learning environment (VLE).

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Get information about daily activities from traditional and electronic sources
  • Produce written information exchanges with an appropriate degree of grammatical accuracy and cultural competence, including simple translation tasks and summaries
  • Engage in basic conversation and mediation activities, with an appropriate degree of accuracy and cultural competence
  • Use various resources, and begin to deploy proactive, independent and collaborative learning strategies
Teaching activities
  • 23 x 2-hour online seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 154 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 250-word coursework project (50% of final mark)
  • a 7-minute oral assessment and presentation (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

This module maps to B1 level of the Council of Europe Common European Framework for Languages. You'll go to seminars in language labs based on written and audio texts, workshops and activities, and get support from resources on our virtual learning environment (VLE). To choose this module, you need an A level in French language, or equivalent.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Get information, ideas and opinions from a variety of simple and complex texts, including some academic texts
  • Through listening, obtain information, opinions and ideas from a range of simple and complex spoken registers
  • Orally present and discuss topics of interest appropriate to your level, including some specialist texts
  • Express yourself with a reasonable degree of accuracy, through a variety of text types making appropriate use of formal and informal registers
Teaching activities
  • 23 x 1-hour seminars (for speaking/listening)
  • 23 x 1-hour seminars (for grammar)
  • 23 x 1-hour seminars (for reading/writing)
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 131 hours studying independently. This is around 8 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 250-word coursework exercise (25% of final mark)
  • a 6-minute oral assessment and presentation (25% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

This module is delivered to you through seminars based on assigned written and audio texts, workshops and directed/open-ended activities supported by resources on our virtual learning environment (VLE).

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Understand information about a variety of familiar (and some unfamiliar) topics from audio sources
  • Apply formal and informal registers in simple conversational exchanges, using the target language (TL) with an appropriate degree of grammatical accuracy and cultural competence
  • Extract information about daily activities from sources that include traditional and electronic formats
  • Produce written information that describes and comments upon present, past and future events, with an appropriate degree of grammatical accuracy and cultural competence
  • Effectively use a variety of resources, and begin to deploy proactive, independent and collaborative learning strategies
Teaching activities
  • 23 x 3 hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 131 hours studying independently. This is around 8 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 40-minute coursework project (25% of final mark)
  • a 4-minute oral assessment and presentation (25% of final mark)
  • a 60-minute written exam (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

The module is delivered to you via seminars based on assigned written and audio texts, workshops and directed/open-ended activities supported by resources on our virtual learning environment (VLE).

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Extract information about daily activities from sources that include traditional and electronic formats
  • Produce written information that describes and comments upon present, past and future events, with an appropriate degree of grammatical accuracy and cultural competence
  • Engage in basic conversation and mediation activities, with an appropriate degree of accuracy and cultural competence.
  • Effectively use a variety of resources, and begin to deploy proactive, independent and collaborative learning strategies
Teaching activities
  • 23 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 154 hours studying independently. This is around 9.33 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 250-word coursework project (50% of final mark)
  • a 7-minute oral assessment and presentation (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll go to seminars in language labs based on written and audio texts, workshops and activities support by resources on our virtual learning environment (VLE). To choose this module, you need an A level or equivalent.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Get information, ideas and opinions from a variety of simple and complex texts, including some academic texts
  • Through listening, get information, opinions and ideas from a range of simple and complex spoken registers
  • Orally present and discuss topics of interest appropriate to your level, including some specialist texts
  • Express yourself with a reasonable degree of accuracy, through a variety of text types making appropriate use of formal and informal registers
Teaching activities
  • 23 x 3-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 131 hours studying independently. This is around 8 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 250-word coursework exercise (25% of final mark)
  • a 6-minute oral assessment and presentation (25% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll go to seminars in language labs based on written and audio texts, workshops and activities support by resources on our virtual learning environment (VLE).

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Through listening, get information about various topics from authentic audio and video sources
  • Communicate simply with formal and informal registers, using the target language (TL) with an appropriate degree of grammatical accuracy and cultural competence.
  • Get information about daily activities from traditional and electronic sources
  • Produce written information that describes and comments on events with an appropriate degree of grammatical accuracy and cultural competence.
  • Use various resources, and begin to deploy proactive, independent and collaborative learning strategies
Teaching activities
  • 23 x 3-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 131 hours studying independently. This is around 8 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 40-minute coursework exercise (25% of final mark)
  • a 4-minute oral assessment and presentation (25% of final mark)
  • a 1-hour written exam (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

This module maps to the A1 and A2 levels of the Council of Europe Common European Framework for Languages. You'll go to seminars in language labs based on written and audio texts, workshops and activities support by resources on our virtual learning environment (VLE).

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Get information about daily activities from traditional and electronic sources
  • Produce written information exchanges with an appropriate degree of grammatical accuracy and cultural competence, including simple translation tasks and summaries
  • Engage in basic conversation and mediation activities, with an appropriate degree of accuracy and cultural competence
  • Use various resources, and begin to deploy proactive, independent and collaborative learning strategies
Teaching activities
  • 23 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 154 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 250-word coursework exercise (50% of final mark)
  • a 7-minute oral assessment and presentation (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll take part in language-related compulsory seminars looking at vocabulary acquisition, effective use of dictionaries, oral presentation skills in the target language and summary writing. You'll also develop a variety of graduate skills such as being able to work both independently and collaboratively, self-management, IT, interpersonal communication and presentation skills.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Find, select and extract information from written, audio-visual and multimodal texts in the target language (TL)
  • Summarise extended texts of various genres and types in the TL
  • Give short individual and group presentations in the TL on cultural, social or current affairs related to the countries or regions you're studying, and respond to questions
  • Support and manage your own learning by researching in the TL and using resources effectively to conduct a variety of language tasks
Teaching activities
  • 23 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 154 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 5-minute oral assessment and presentation (30% of final mark)
  • a 7-minute oral assessment and presentation (40% of final mark)
  • a 600-word written assignment (30% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll take part in language-related compulsory seminars looking at vocabulary acquisition, effective use of dictionaries, oral presentation skills in the target language, and summary writing. You'll also develop a variety of graduate skills, such as being able to work independently and collaboratively, self-management, IT, interpersonal communication and presentation skills.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Find, select and extract information from written, audio-visual and multimodal texts in the target language (TL)
  • Summarise extended texts of various genres and types in the TL
  • Give short individual and group presentations in the TL on cultural, social or current affairs related to the countries or regions you're studying, and respond to questions
  • Support and manage your own learning by researching in the TL and using resources effectively to conduct a variety of language tasks
Teaching activities
  • 23 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 154 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 5-minute oral assessment and presentation (30% of final mark)
  • a 7-minute oral assessment and presentation (40% of final mark)
  • a 600-word written assignment (30% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll take part in language-related compulsory seminars looking at vocabulary acquisition, effective use of dictionaries, oral presentations skills in the target language and summary writing. You'll also develop a variety of graduate skills, such as self-management, IT, interpersonal communication and presentation skills, as well as your ability to work both independently and collaboratively.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Find, select and extract information from written, audio-visual and multimodal texts in the target language (TL)
  • Summarise extended texts of various genres and types in the TL
  • Give short individual and group presentations in the TL on cultural, social or current affairs related to the countries or regions you're studying, and respond to questions
  • Support and manage your own learning by researching in the TL and using resources effectively to conduct a variety of language tasks
Teaching activities
  • 23 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 154 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 5-minute oral assessment and presentation (30% of final mark)
  • a 7-minute oral assessment and presentation (40% of final mark)
  • a 600-word written assignment (30% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll examine language change, regional and social variations, and language and gender as well as some of the issues involved in forensic linguistics. You’ll explore the relationship between language and the mind, considering it through an examination of how first and second languages are acquired and by looking at the ways language is processed and remembered.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Identify various functions of language and the different uses of language for different purposes
  • Reflect on and describe relationships between the individual, groups, society and language
  • Identify linguistic variation in relation to factors such as geographical region, social class, ethnicity, gender and nation
  • Describe aspects of the relationship between language and mind/thought
  • Explain how first and second languages are acquired, produced and comprehended
  • Collect relevant information from external sources and present your findings on the relevance of aspects of linguistics in a wider context
Teaching activities
  • 11 x 1-hour lectures
  • 11 x 1-hour practical classes and workshops
  • 12 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 154 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 15-minute oral assessment and presentation (25% of final mark)
  • a 1,000-word written assignment including essay (25% of final mark)
  • a 1-hour written exam (50% of final mark) – computerised

What you'll do

You'll go to seminars in language labs based on written and audio texts, workshops and activities support by resources on our virtual learning environment (VLE).

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Get information about daily activities from traditional and electronic sources
  • Produce written information exchanges with an appropriate degree of grammatical accuracy and cultural competence, including simple translation tasks and summaries
  • Engage in basic conversation and mediation activities, with an appropriate degree of accuracy and cultural competence
  • Use various resources, and begin to deploy proactive, independent and collaborative learning strategies
Teaching activities
  • 23 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 154 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 250-word coursework exercise (50% of final mark)
  • a 7-minute oral assessment and presentation (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll go to seminars in language labs based on written and audio texts, workshops and activities support by resources on our virtual learning environment (VLE).

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Through listening, get information about various topics from authentic audio and video sources
  • Communicate simply with formal and informal registers, using the target language (TL) with an appropriate degree of grammatical accuracy and cultural competence
  • Get information about daily activities from traditional and electronic sources
  • Produce written information that describes and comments on events with an appropriate degree of grammatical accuracy and cultural competence
  • Use various resources, and begin to deploy proactive, independent and collaborative learning strategies
Teaching activities
  • 23 x 3-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 131 hours studying independently. This is around 8 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 40-minute coursework exercise (25% of final mark)
  • a 4-minute oral assessment and presentation (25% of final mark)
  • a 1-hour written exam (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll go to seminars in language labs based on written and audio texts, workshops and activities support by resources on our virtual learning environment (VLE).

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Through listening, get information about various topics from authentic audio and video sources
  • Communicate simply with formal and informal registers, using the target language (TL) with an appropriate degree of grammatical accuracy and cultural competence.
  • Get information about daily activities from traditional and electronic sources
  • Produce written information that describes and comments on events with an appropriate degree of grammatical accuracy and cultural competence.
  • Use various resources, and begin to deploy proactive, independent and collaborative learning strategies
Teaching activities
  • 23 x 3 hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 131 hours studying independently. This is around 8 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 40-minute coursework exercise (25% of final mark)
  • a 4-minute oral assessment and presentation (25% of final mark)
  • a 60-minute written exam (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll go to seminars in language labs based on written and audio texts, workshops and activities support by resources on our virtual learning environment (VLE).

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Get information about daily activities from traditional and electronic sources
  • Produce written information exchanges with an appropriate degree of grammatical accuracy and cultural competence, including simple translation tasks and summaries
  • Engage in basic conversation and mediation activities, with an appropriate degree of accuracy and cultural competence
  • Use various resources, and begin to deploy proactive, independent and collaborative learning strategies
Teaching activities
  • 23 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 154 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 250-word coursework exercise (50% of final mark)
  • a 7-minute oral assessment and presentation (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll go to seminars in language labs based on written and audio texts, workshops and activities supported by resources on our virtual learning environment (VLE). To choose this module, you need an A level or equivalent.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Get information, ideas and opinions from a variety of simple and complex texts, including some academic texts
  • Through listening, get information, opinions and ideas from simple and complex spoken registers
  • Orally present and discuss topics of interest appropriate to your level, including some specialist texts
  • Express yourself with a reasonable degree of accuracy, through a variety of text types making appropriate use of formal and informal registers
Teaching activities
  • 23 x 3-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 131 hours studying independently. This is around 8 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 250-word coursework exercise (25% of final mark)
  • a 6-minute oral assessment and presentation (25% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (50% of final mark)

Year 2

Core modules

What you'll do

You'll attend two group lectures in October and November to get generic information about your year abroad and to help you choose the type of placement you'd prefer.In December you'll go to a language-specific lecture for information on specific destinations you can choose, and in April/May you'll get more specific information about assessments, formalities and risk assessment to fully prepare you for your year abroad.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Understand the options available for your third year abroad
  • Make an informed choice on your year abroad options
  • Understand all year abroad requirements in terms of formalities and assessment
Teaching activities
  • 4 x 1-hour lectures
  • 1 x 1-hour lectures (an additional language-specific lecture for students studying one language)
  • 2 x 1-hour lectures (2 additional language-specific lectures for students studying 2 languages)

Optional modules

What you'll do

You'll explore institutions that regulate national and international business and economic relations and apply tools for the analysis on business environments. You'll also study the strategies that countries and businesses can adopt to remain competitive in an increasingly global environment and discuss issues around the responsibility of businesses in their operations and practices.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Explore the role of national, regional and international institutions in regulating global economic relations
  • Examine and analyse a number of factors that impact on global business, such as privatisation, liberalisation and deregulation, corporate governance or labour market flexibility
  • Apply selected theories of marketing to analyse specific markets
  • Identify and discuss how business responds to these issues through company case studies from a national, regional and/or global perspective
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 1-hour lectures
  • 12 x 1-hour seminars
  • 12 x 1-hour practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 164 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 2,000-word coursework project (50% of final mark)
  • a 60-minute written exam (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll examine how they interact with each other and the impact that a successful economy has on traditional Asian values.

What you’ll learn

When you complete this unit successfully, you'll be able to demonstrate an understanding of:

  • The potential, legitimacy and formation of East Asia as a sub-region in the global economy
  • China’s economic reforms and its role in the regional and global economy
  • The impact of China’s growth domestically and internationally
  • The concept of 'developmental state' and its varying applications in East Asian economies
  • Individual economies and the dynamics of their regional configuration
  • The major challenges economies in East Asia face
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 1-hour lectures
  • 10 x 1-hour discussion classes
  • 2 x 1-hour coursework tutorials

You'll also have continuous online access to supporting materials, and get regular feedback from teaching staff.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the unit.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a poster (40% of final mark)
  • an essay (60% of final mark)

You'll be able to test your skills and knowledge informally before your final assessments.

What you'll do

You'll begin by examining the experiences of dictatorship and military rule across the region, some of the reasons for the collapse of these regimes and the transitions to democracy that took place towards the end of the 20th century. You'll then move on to explore how countries in the region have consolidated democracy and look at the role of international actors in this process, while considering some of the challenges facing the region today and examining a number of case studies of countries with uncertain paths to democracy.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Analyse the nature of Latin American military regimes and the aftermath of military rule
  • Critically evaluate the transitions to democracy in Latin America
  • Explain the different experiences of democratisation across Latin America
  • Critically evaluate the relationship between democratisation and development, including the role of international actors in these processes
  • Apply knowledge of processes and political actors in democratisation
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 1-hour lectures
  • 8 x 1-hour seminars
  • 1 x 1-hour tutorial
  • 3 x 1-hour practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 15-minute oral assessment and presentation (30% of final mark)
  • a 2,500-word written assignment (70% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll look at a regional overview, a case study of four countries and theme-based regional comparisons while getting an introduction to comparative and transnational perspectives. You'll learn to appreciate the regional dynamics in historical legacy and current political, socioeconomic and cultural development.

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Understand the impact of modernisation and development on the relationship between state and society
  • Comment on how gender is embedded in practices of employment, content of entertainment, and key sociopolitical institutions in East Asian states
  • Compare the concepts of race and ethnicity in the contexts of racism, nationalism and multiculturalism in East Asian states
  • Acquire country-specific knowledge and a dynamic regional perspective built on cultural heritage, colonial legacy, geopolitical structure and economic interaction
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 1-hour lectures
  • 10 x 1-hour seminars
  • 2 x 1-hour tutorials
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,000-word written assignment (40% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word written assignment (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll look at the concept that France acts as if it has a 'right' to a global presence, questioning where those assumptions come from and to what end.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Critically evaluate the significance of France in contemporary international relations
  • Critically discuss the characteristics of French foreign and defence policy since 1958
  • Critically evaluate contested notions of French power
  • Use appropriate academic conventions and subject specific terminology to present a clear discussion of a topic
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 1-hour lectures
  • 12 x 1-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 20-minute oral assessment and presentation (30% of final mark)
  • a 2,500-word written assignment (70% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll go to seminars in language labs based on written and audio texts, workshops and activities supported by resources on our virtual learning environment (VLE). You'll also take part in presentations and group work covering the four skills. To choose this module, you need to take the French Grade 1 and 2 - General Language and French Grade 1 and 2 - Language in Use modules in year one.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Through listening, get information about various topics from authentic audio and video sources
  • Communicate effectively with native speakers of the target language (TL) in social, academic and work-related situations using the appropriate register
  • Extract information about a variety of topics from authentic written sources of different genres
  • Produce written texts for different purposes using appropriate register, style, vocabulary and grammatical structures
  • Recognise relevant linguistic conventions and cultural values of the target countries and respond to them in a culturally informed and sensitive manner
  • Support and manage your own learning by effectively using resources and learning strategies
Teaching activities
  • 22 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 156 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 6-minute coursework exercise (50% of final mark)
  • a 40-minute exam (50% of final mark)

What you'll do 

You'll go to seminars in language labs based on written and audio texts, workshops and activities support by resources on our virtual learning environment (VLE). You'll also take part in presentations and group work covering the four skills. To choose this module, you need to take the French General Language Grade 3 and 4 (Part 1) module in year two.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Through listening, get information about various topics from authentic audio and video sources
  • Communicate effectively with native speakers of the target language (TL) in social, academic and work-related situations using the appropriate register
  • Extract information about a variety of topics from authentic written sources of different genres
  • Produce written texts for different purposes using appropriate register, style, vocabulary and grammatical structures
  • Recognise relevant linguistic conventions and cultural values of the target countries and respond to them in a culturally informed and sensitive manner
  • Support and manage your own learning by effectively using resources and learning strategies
Teaching activities
  • 24 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 250-word coursework exercise (25% of final mark)
  • a 5-minute oral assessment and presentation (25% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll go to seminars in language labs based on written and audio texts, workshops and activities, and get support from resources on our virtual learning environment (VLE). To choose this module, you need to take the French General Language Grade 3 module in year one.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Get information, ideas and opinions from a variety of simple and complex texts, including some academic texts
  • Through listening, get information, opinions and ideas from a range of simple and complex spoken registers
  • Orally present and discuss topics of interest appropriate to your level, including specialist/academic topics
  • Express yourself with a reasonable degree of accuracy, through a variety of text types, making appropriate use of formal and informal registers
Teaching activities
  • 23 x 2-hour seminars
  • 23 x 1-hour seminars (focusing on listening and speaking skills)
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 131 hours studying independently. This is around 8 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 300-word coursework exercise (25% of final mark)
  • a 7-minute oral presentation (25% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll go to seminars in language labs based on written and audio texts, workshops and activities support by resources on our virtual learning environment (VLE). To choose this module, you need to take the German Grade 1 and 2 - General Language and German Grade 1 and 2 - Language in Use modules in year one.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Through listening, get information about various topics from authentic audio and video sources
  • Communicate effectively with native speakers of the target language (TL) in social, academic and work-related situations using the appropriate register
  • Extract information about a variety of topics from authentic written sources of different genres
  • Produce written texts for different purposes using appropriate register, style, vocabulary and grammatical structures
  • Recognise relevant linguistic conventions and cultural values of the target countries and respond to them in a culturally informed and sensitive manner
  • Support and manage your own learning by effectively using resources and learning strategies
Teaching activities
  • 22 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 156 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 6-minute coursework exercise (50% of final mark)
  • a 40-minute exam (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll go to seminars in language labs based on written and audio texts, workshops and activities support by resources on our virtual learning environment (VLE). You'll also take part in presentations and group work covering the four skills. To choose this module, you need to take the German General Language Grade 3 and 4 (Part 1) module in year two.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Through listening, get information about various topics from authentic audio and video sources
  • Communicate effectively with native speakers of the target language (TL) in social, academic and work-related situations using the appropriate register
  • Extract information about a variety of topics from authentic written sources of different genres
  • Produce written texts for different purposes using appropriate register, style, vocabulary and grammatical structures
  • Recognise relevant linguistic convention and cultural value in target countries and respond to them in a culturally informed and sensitive manner
  • Support and manage your own learning by effectively using resources and learning strategies
Teaching activities
  • 24 x 2-hour lectures
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 164 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment
  • a 250-word coursework exercise (25% of final mark)
  • a 5-minute oral assessment and presentation (25% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll go to seminars in language labs based on written and audio texts, workshops and activities, and get support from resources on our virtual learning environment (VLE). To choose this module, you need to take the German General Language Grade 3 module in year one.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Get information, ideas and opinions from a variety of simple and complex texts, including some academic texts
  • Through listening, get information, opinions and ideas from a range of simple and complex spoken registers
  • Orally present and discuss topics of interest appropriate to your level, including specialist/academic topics
  • Express yourself with a reasonable degree of accuracy, through a variety of text types, making appropriate use of formal and informal registers
Teaching activities
  • 23 x 3-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 131 hours studying independently. This is around 8 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 300-word coursework exercise (25% of final mark)
  • a 7-minute oral assessment and presentation (25% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll learn how the American empire penetrated the politics, culture and economy of Germany. You'll also explore if Germany, the country that caused two world wars and was divided into two states during the cold war, has become more American during this tumultuous century.

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Assess and describe the forces, processes and themes associated with the Americanisation of Germany in the twentieth century
  • Evaluate the historical literature and selected primary sources about Americanisation and American influence on Germany
  • Apply different tools associated with Americanisation and cultural transfer to case studies
  • Communicate ideas effectively
  • Use appropriate academic and subject specific terminology to present a clearly written discussion of a topic
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 1-hour lectures
  • 12 x 1-hour seminars 
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 15-minute oral assessment and presentation (25% of final mark)
  • a 1,000-word written assignment (25% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute exercise (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll work as part of an international team, communicating your findings in writing and through a web page.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Assess key theories in intercultural communication research
  • Collect data/information and analyse it from an intercultural perspective
  • Research a certain aspect of culture and communication 
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 1-hour lectures
  • 12 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 164 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 500-word coursework report (10% of final mark)
  • a 1,500-word coursework assignment (40% of final mark) – group website project
  • a 1,500-word written coursework assignment (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll develop fundamental skills needed to be a teacher, and the capability to structure and deliver a short lesson.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Analyse the expectations of a professional teacher in terms of skills, knowledge and conduct
  • Discuss the importance of safeguarding students
  • Apply fundamental concepts of teaching and learning theory to plan an effective, peer-assessed lesson
  • Deliver lesson plans with clear objectives, student-centred learning and assessment of learning
  • Reflect on the use of active learning methods within subject specialism
Teaching activities
  • 10 x 2-hour seminars
  • 2 x 1-hour tutorials
  • 10 x 1-hour lectures
  • 4 x 1-hour practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 164 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 20-minute practical skills assessment (50% of final mark)
  • a 1,500-word written assignment (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

To choose this module, you need to take a General Language Grade 3 module in year one.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Familiarise yourself with a range of genres/text types
  • Develop skills in translation practice
  • Discuss practical problems posed by authentic texts
  • Use research and digital technologies to develop professional translation skills
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 1-hour lectures
  • 12 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 164 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 40-minute exam (40% of final mark)
  • a 1,400-word written assignment (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll go to seminars in language labs based on written and audio texts, workshops and activities support by resources on our virtual learning environment (VLE). You'll learn advanced grammar structures and new vocabulary relevant to different Italian topics covered in the unit, with emphasis on your year abroad. To choose this module, you need to take the Italian Grade 1 and 2 - General Language and Italian Grade 1 and 2 - Language in Use modules in year one.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Through listening, get information about various topics from authentic audio and video sources
  • Communicate effectively with native speakers of the target language (TL) in social, academic and work-related situations using the appropriate register
  • Extract information about a variety of topics from authentic written sources of different genres
  • Produce written texts for different purposes using appropriate register, style, vocabulary and grammatical structures
  • Recognise relevant linguistic conventions and cultural values of the target countries and respond to them in a culturally informed and sensitive manner
  • Support and manage your own learning by effectively using resources and learning strategies
Teaching activities
  • 22 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 156 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 6-minute coursework exercise (50% of final mark)
  • a 40-minute exam (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

This module maps to the lower B2 level of the Council of Europe Common European Framework for Languages. To choose this module, you need to take the Italian General Language Grade 3 and 4 (Part 1) module in year two.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Through listening, get information about various topics from authentic audio and video sources
  • Communicate effectively with native speakers of the target language (TL) in social, academic and work-related situations using the appropriate register
  • Extract information about a variety of topics from authentic written sources of different genres
  • Produce written texts for different purposes using appropriate register, style, vocabulary and grammatical structures
  • Recognise relevant linguistic conventions and cultural values of the target countries and respond to them in a culturally informed and sensitive manner
  • Support and manage your own learning by effectively using resources and learning strategies
Teaching activities
  • 24 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 250-word coursework exercise (25% of final mark)
  • a 5-minute oral assessment and presentation (25% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll enter at the appropriate level for your existing language knowledge. If you combine this module with language study in your first or third year, you can turn this module into a certificated course that is aligned with the Common European Framework for Languages (CEFRL).

What you'll learn

When you complete this module:

  • You'll have improved your linguistic skills in Arabic, British Sign Language, Italian, Japanese, Mandarin, French, German or Spanish
  • You'll be prepared for Erasmus study abroad
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through: 

  • coursework (100% of final mark) 

What you'll do

You'll also develop a range of communication and intercultural skills in different workplace contexts to help you when looking for employment and living and working abroad. This module maps to the Council of Europe Common European Framework of Reference for Languages Grade B2, and helps you achieve some of the learning outcomes associated with C1.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Identify the differences in working practices between the UK and the target country (TC)
  • Use your expanded language skills to give oral presentations, be prepared for job interviews and produce professional written communications
  • Conduct interpersonal communication functions in a business and organisation context
  • Research job opportunities, background, structure, products and services of a given company, international organisation or NGO in the target language (TL)
  • Use specialised vocabulary and software to write a multimedia report in the TL on a company or NGO
  • Reflect on your performance of language-based tasks and activities, and support and identify personal development needs
Teaching activities
  • 23 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 154 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 500-word coursework exercise (30% of final mark)
  • a 7-minute coursework exercise (30% of final mark)
  • a 1,500-word coursework exercise (40% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll also develop a range of communication and intercultural skills in different workplace contexts, to help you when looking for employment, as well as living and working abroad. This module maps to the Council of Europe Common European Framework of Reference for Languages Grade B2, as well as helping you achieve some of the learning outcomes associated with C1.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Identify the differences in working practices between the UK and the target country (TC)
  • Use your expanded language skills to give oral presentations, be prepared for job interviews and produce professional written communications
  • Conduct interpersonal communication functions in a business and organisational context
  • Research job opportunities, background, structure, products and services of a given company, international organisation or NGO in the target language (TL)
  • Use specialised vocabulary and software to write a multimedia report in the TL, on a company or NGO
  • Reflect on your performance of language-based tasks and activities, and support and identify personal development needs
Teaching activities
  • 23 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 154 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

At the end of this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 500-word coursework exercise (30% of final mark)
  • a 7-minute coursework exercise (30% of final mark)
  • a 1,500-word coursework exercise (40% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll also develop a range of communication and intercultural skills in different workplace contexts, helping you when looking for employment, as well as living and working abroad. This module maps to the Council of Europe Common European Framework of Reference for Languages Grade B2, and helps you achieve some of the learning outcomes associated with C1.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Identify the differences in working practices between the UK and the target country (TC)
  • Use your expanded language skills to give oral presentations, be prepared for job interviews and produce professional written communications
  • Conduct interpersonal communication in a business and organisation context
  • Research job opportunities, background, structure, products and services of a given company, international organisation or NGO in the target language (TL)
  • Use specialised vocabulary and software to write a multimedia report in the TL on a company or NGO
  • Reflect on your performance of language-based tasks and activities, and support and identify personal development needs
Teaching activities
  • 23 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 154 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 500-word coursework exercise (30% of final mark)
  • a 7-minute coursework exercise (30% of final mark)
  • a 1,500-word coursework exercise (40% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll organise your own programme of learning activities to total at least 80 hours, supported by faculty-led workshops.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Reflect on your learning and experience to date and use this to organise suitable work experience
  • Propose a programme of learning that will demonstrate and develop your employability skills
  • Critically evaluate your learning and experience and relate this to your future career goals
  • Use reflective practice to communicate the results of your experience
Teaching activities
  • 9 x 2-hour practical classes and workshops
  • 2 x 1-hour tutorials
  • 80-hours of work-based learning
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 180 hours studying independently. This is around 11 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 4,000-word coursework report (100% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll also gain practical experience of current education practices from your school placement. This module can be part of your initial teacher training (ITT) pathway, leading to accredited Qualified Teacher Status.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Discuss how pupils learn and how this impacts on teaching
  • Identify the factors that can inhibit pupils’ ability to learn, and how to overcome these
  • Identify strategies for fostering and maintaining pupils’ interest in the subject and addressing misunderstandings
  • Plan and deliver a lesson, or part of a lesson, informed by specialist subject knowledge
  • Engage in self evaluation and reflection on your teaching placement
Teaching activities
  • 20 x 2-hour practical classes and workshops
  • 56 hours of placement
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 160 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 2,500-word written assignment (90% of final mark)
  • a coursework portfolio (10% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll explore how core cultural theories can inform managers and professionals in their leadership styles and assist them in the development of appropriate management strategies. You'll also look at ways that groups function in different cultural and management contexts, and the implications of this for the management of people.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Comment with critical awareness on management and leadership in the global workplace
  • Identify and evaluate a number of different cross-cultural perspectives on the management of organisations and people
  • Critically analyse chosen aspects of processes and systems for the management of people in different professional cultural contexts
  • Write a professional report, with reference to relevant theory, which identifies management challenges and possible solutions in a specific cross-cultural workplace
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 1-hour lecures
  • 12 x 2-hour practical classes and workshops
  • 12 x 1-hour tutorials
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 20-minute oral assessment and presentation (40% of final mark)
  • a 1,500-word coursework report (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll go to seminars in language labs based on written and audio texts, workshops and activities supported by resources on our virtual learning environment (VLE). To choose this module, you need to take the Mandarin Grade 1 and 2 - General Language and Mandarin Grade 1 and 2 - Language in Use modules in year one.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Through listening, get information about various topics from authentic audio and video sources
  • Communicate effectively with native speakers of the target language (TL) in social, academic and work-related situations using the appropriate register
  • Extract information about a variety of topics from authentic written sources of different genres
  • Produce written texts for different purposes using appropriate register, style, vocabulary and grammatical structures
  • Recognise relevant linguistic conventions and cultural values of the target countries and respond to them in a culturally informed and sensitive manner
  • Support and manage your own learning by effectively using resources and learning strategies
Teaching activities
  • 22 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 156 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 6-minute coursework exercise (50% of final mark)
  • a 40-minute exam (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll go to seminars in language labs based on written and audio texts, workshops and activities supported by resources on our virtual learning environment (VLE). To choose this module, you need to take the Mandarin General Language Grade 3 and 4 (Part 1) module in year two.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Through listening, get information about various topics from authentic audio and video sources
  • Communicate effectively with native speakers of the target language (TL) in social, academic and work-related situations using the appropriate register
  • Extract information about a variety of topics from authentic written sources of different genres
  • Produce written texts for different purposes using appropriate register, style, vocabulary and grammatical structures
  • Recognise relevant linguistic conventions and cultural values of the target countries and respond to them in a culturally informed and sensitive manner
  • Support and manage your own learning by effectively using resources and learning strategies
Teaching activities

24 x 2-hour seminars

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through

  • a 250-word coursework exercise (25% of final mark)
  • a 5-minute oral assessment and presentation (25% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll compare and contrast contentious interpretations in the secondary literature, and explore why there have been major shifts in the debate since the end of World War II. You'll also look at the origins and nature of the Holocaust, and the impact of the Nazi period on German politics and society from 1945.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Explain the rise of Nazism (fascism)
  • Analyse National Socialist ideologies and specific policies
  • Compare the types of support for and against Nazism
  • Debate the contested origins and implementation of the Holocaust
  • Analyse the significance of the legacy of the ""Third Reich"" in Germany from 1945 to the present
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 1-hour lectures
  • 12 x 1-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 15-minute oral assessment and presentation (20% of final mark)
  • a 2,500-word written assignment including essay (80% of final mark)

What you'll do

Through works such as García Lorca's 'The House of Bernarda Alba' and Polanski's 'Death and the Maiden', you'll examine topics that include legitimacy, gender and class relations, alienation at the modern metropolis, and the impact of political violence and repression in contemporary Spain and Latin America.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Evaluate the social and political impact of literature and film
  • Analyse cultural representations of Hispanic societies
  • Situate cultural representations of Hispanic societies in their national and historical context
  • Communicate ideas effectively, in a manner appropriate to the target audience
  • Use academic and subject specific terminology to present a clearly written discussion of a topic
Teaching activities
  • 2 x 1-hour practical classes and workshops
  • 12 x 1-hour lectures
  • 10 x 1-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 15-minute oral assessment and presentation (30% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word written assignment (70% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll look at the Spanish-American War (1898) to the end of Franco’s rule (1975) and develop key critical thinking and reflective skills.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Explain the causes and consequences of political and social conflict in twentieth century Spain, considering the international dimension of Spanish politics when appropriate
  • Identify the strategies of radical groups and movements, and explain their contribution to political, economic and cultural life in late-nineteenth and twentieth century Spain
  • Evaluate the theoretical perspectives around the study of political and social conflict in twentieth century Spain
  • Analyse the hopes and aspirations of the factions that dominated post-Civil War politics and society in Spain
  • Explain written and visual representations of Spanish reality in the twentieth century
Teaching activities
  • 14 x 1-hour lectures
  • 6 x 1-hour discussion classes
  • 4 hours of poster presentations
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 20-minute oral assessment and presentation (30% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word written assignment (70% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll go to seminars in language labs based on written and audio texts, workshops and activities supported by resources on our virtual learning environment (VLE). To choose this module, you need to take the Spanish Grade 1 and 2 - General Language and Spanish Grade 1 and 2 - Language in Use modules in year one.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Through listening, get information about various topics from authentic audio and video sources
  • Communicate effectively with native speakers of the target language (TL) in social, academic and work-related situations using the appropriate register
  • Extract information about a variety of topics from authentic written sources of different genres
  • Produce written texts for different purposes using appropriate register, style, vocabulary and grammatical structures
  • Recognise relevant linguistic conventions and cultural values of the target countries and respond to them in a culturally informed and sensitive manner
  • Support and manage your own learning by effectively using resources and learning strategies
Teaching activities
  • 22 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 156 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 6-minute coursework exercise (50% of final mark)
  • a 40-minute exam (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll go to seminars in language labs based on written and audio texts, workshops and activities supported by resources on our virtual learning environment (VLE). To choose this module, you need to take the Spanish General Language Grade 3 and 4 (Part 1) module in year two.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Through listening, get information about various topics from authentic audio and video sources
  • Communicate effectively with native speakers of the target language (TL) in social, academic and work-related situations using the appropriate register
  • Extract information about a variety of topics from authentic written sources of different genres
  • Produce written texts for different purposes using appropriate register, style, vocabulary and grammatical structures
  • Recognise relevant linguistic conventions and cultural values of the target countries and respond to them in a culturally informed and sensitive manner
  • Support and manage your own learning by effectively using resources and learning strategies
Teaching activities
  • 24 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 250-word coursework exercise (25% of final mark)
  • a 5-minute oral assessment and presentation (25% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

In your seminars you'll work with textbooks and take part in communication activities with other students, and seminars are supported by resources on our virtual learning environment (VLE). You'll also spend time in language labs, focusing on listening and speaking skills. To choose this module, you need to take the Spanish General Language Grade 3 module in year one.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Get information, ideas and opinions from a variety of simple and complex texts, including some academic texts
  • Through listening, get information, opinions and ideas from a range of simple and complex spoken registers
  • Orally present and discuss topics of interest appropriate to your level, including specialist/academic topics
  • Express yourself with a reasonable degree of accuracy, through a variety of text types making appropriate use of formal and informal registers
Teaching activities
  • 23 x 2-hour seminars
  • 23 x 1-hour seminars (focusing on listening and speaking skills)
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 131 hours studying independently. This is around 8 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 300-word coursework exercise (25% of final mark)
  • a 7-minute oral presentation (25% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll develop the skills and knowledge to contextualise current affairs in terms of long-term political and social structures, and recurrent themes in French history. You'll also be encouraged to adopt a comparative perspective to evaluate the extent to which France is an exceptional nation, often at odds with her neighbours.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Analyse recent key developments in French politics and society
  • Evaluate the significance of various institutions, organisations and individuals in terms of their relationship with power in France
  • Reflect on the impact of increasing global interdependence on France
  • Communicate ideas in a manner appropriate to the target audience
  • Present a reasoned argument in written form, using appropriate academic/subject specific terminology
Teaching activities
  • 11 x 1-hour lectures
  • 11 x 1-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 178 hours studying independently. This is around 11 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 20-minute oral assessment and presentation (30% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word written assignment (70% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll learn how legacies of colonialism and imperialism shaped cinematic production in different regions, and  study the impact of the move away from national filmmaking in favour of global funding, distribution and exhibition networks.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Interpret, analyse and explain aesthetic, thematic, political and economic concerns of transnational films and filmmakers
  • Apply key theoretical reading to analysis of films
  • Critically assess how new technologies, production and exhibition contexts impact on national and transnational filmmaking
  • Evaluate the relationship of film to wider geo-political agendas and concerns
  • Critically understand and articulate distribution, marketing and reception of transnational work
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures, tutorials and an online web design workshop.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 163 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a quiz (30% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word assignment (70% of final mark) – in this assignment you'll design a website

Year 3

Core module

What you'll do

This module may be taken in your third year of a four-year degree programme for a period of no less than 15 weeks (one semester) or 30 weeks (full year).

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Explain and illustrate how your knowledge, understanding and subject specific skills (defined in the programme specification and your individual learning agreement) have been enhanced by the learning experience
  • Contrast the culture of the country (or countries) visited with that of your home country
  • Explain and illustrate how the learning experience has increased your knowledge of the world you're functioning in (university, school or workplace)
  • Reflect on your learning, strengths, weaknesses and performance including your ability to speak and write your foreign language(s) more fluently and accurately (if your placement is in a non-English speaking country)
Teaching activities
  • 1200-hours of abroad study
Independent study time

n/a

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 3,000-word coursework project (100% of final mark)

Year 4

Optional modules

What you'll do

You'll examine how they interact with each other and the impact that a successful economy has on traditional Asian values.

What you’ll learn

When you complete this unit successfully, you'll be able to demonstrate an understanding of:

  • The potential, legitimacy and formation of East Asia as a sub-region in the global economy
  • China’s economic reforms and its role in the regional and global economy
  • The impact of China’s growth domestically and internationally
  • The concept of 'developmental state' and its varying applications in East Asian economies
  • Individual economies and the dynamics of their regional configuration
  • The major challenges economies in East Asia face
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 1-hour lectures
  • 10 x 1-hour discussion classes
  • 2 x 1-hour coursework tutorials

You'll also have continuous online access to supporting materials, and get regular feedback from teaching staff.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the unit.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a poster (40% of final mark)
  • an essay (60% of final mark)

You'll be able to test your skills and knowledge informally before your final assessments.

What you'll do

Digital communication includes many different types of technology, such as chat, online advertising and social media. You'll focus on the analysis of computer-mediated-communication (CMC) practices, the language used in CMC and the social structures that emerge when people use these applications.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Compare the structure and function of different types of social media platforms
  • Critically evaluate various communication strategies of different types of digital media
  • Evaluate the way social relationships and identities are affected by electronic communication
  • Develop presentation and public speaking skills
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 1-hour lectures
  • 12 x 1-hour seminars
Independent study time

This module requires a high level of commitment to independent study outside the classroom. We recommend you spend at least 5–8 hours a week studying independently.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 10/15-minute oral assessment and presentation (30% of final mark) - this presentation includes the use of live tweets
  • a 2,500-word written assignment (70% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll look at regional overviews, a case study of four countries and theme-based regional comparisons, while getting an introduction to comparative and transnational perspectives. You'll learn to appreciate the regional dynamics in historical legacy and current political, socioeconomic and cultural development.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Compare the experiences of East Asian states with those of 'Western' states in the context of colonialism, nationalism, multiculturalism and development
  • Critically analyse how gender, class, and ethnicity are related to nationalism, marriage, employment, and leisure
  • Apply a regional perspective to inter-state dynamics with regard to cultural heritage conservation, colonial legacy, geopolitical structure and economic interaction
  • Collect, analyse, synthesise and present data accurately
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 1-hour lectures
  • 10 x 1-hour seminars
  • 2 x 1-hour tutorials
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,000-word written assignment (40% of final mark)
  • a 2,500-word written assignment (60% of final mark)

 

What you'll do

You'll look at the concept that France acts as if it has a 'right' to a global presence, questioning where those assumptions come from and to what end.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Critically evaluate the significance of France in contemporary international relations
  • Critically discuss the characteristics of French foreign and defence policy since 1958
  • Critically evaluate contested notions of French power
  • Use appropriate academic conventions and subject specific terminology to communicate effectively
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 1-hour lectures
  • 12 x 1-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 20-minute oral assessment and presentation (30% of final mark)
  • a 2,500-word written assignment (70% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll go to seminars in language labs based on written and audio texts, workshops and activities, and get support from resources on our virtual learning environment (VLE). To choose this module, you need to take General Language Grade 5, usually achieved through a study abroad year.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Get information, ideas and opinions from a variety of simple and complex texts, including some academic texts
  • Through listening, get information, opinions and ideas from a range of simple and complex spoken registers
  • Orally present and discuss topics of interest appropriate to your level, including specialist and academic topics
  • Express yourself with a reasonable degree of accuracy, through a variety of text types, making appropriate use of formal and informal registers
Teaching activities
  • 23 x 3-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 131 hours studying independently. This is around 8 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 350-word coursework exercise (25% of final mark)
  • a 10-minute oral assessment and presentation (25% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll look at first-person perspectives and contemporary ‘post-memory’ point of views. You'll also evaluate how the Holocaust is represented, and study the ethics of writing and memorialisation.

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Identify and critically define key concepts that influence Holocaust writing
  • Critically assess the ways in which trauma and memory influence Holocaust writing
  • Analyse the importance of Holocaust writing in the formation of cultural memory
  • Conduct critical readings of Holocaust writing that are informed by a broad selection of critical and theoretical approaches, and reflective of wide-ranging independent research
  • Creatively author a portfolio of innovative reflections on selected Holocaust writing
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 1-hour lectures
  • 12 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 164 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,500-word group portfolio (40% of final mark)
  • a 2,500-word written assignment including essay (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

The skills you'll develop include public speaking, speech analysis and synthesis, memory and note-taking techniques, vocabulary reactivation, speech reformulation and communication skills. You'll also create a blog to review your practice, the practice of your peers, and how theory underpins your practice.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Listen actively to a dialogue on general topics
  • Show effective communication skills
  • Accurately and fluently translate a message into the target language, understanding relevant language and cultural references from the source language
  • Critically review your practice and that of your peers
  • Reflect on the links between theory and practice, ethics and etiquette
Teaching activities
  • 11 x 3-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 167 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,500-word written assignment (40% of final mark)
  • a 15-minute oral assessment and presentation (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll develop consecutive and simultaneous interpreting skills. All seminars will take place in our conference interpreting training suite.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Listen actively to a dialogue/speech on general and specialised topics
  • Use developed communication skills in realistic scenarios
  • Accurately and fluently translate a message into the target language, understanding relevant language and cultural references from the source language, context and settings
  • Critically review your practice and that of your peers
  • Reflect on the links between theory and practice, ethics and etiquette
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 3-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 164 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 15-minute oral assessment (40% of final mark)
  • a 1,500-word coursework report (20% of final mark)
  • a 15-minute oral assessment (40% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll develop fundamental skills needed to be a teacher, and the capability to structure and deliver a short lesson.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Analyse the expectations of a professional teacher in terms of skills, knowledge and conduct
  • Discuss the importance of safeguarding students
  • Apply fundamental concepts of teaching and learning theory to plan an effective, peer-assessed lesson
  • Deliver lesson plans with clear objectives, student-centred learning and assessment of learning
  • Reflect on the use of active learning methods within subject specialism
Teaching activities
  • 10 x 2-hour seminars
  • 2 x 1-hour tutorials
  • 10 x 1-hour lectures
  • 4 x 1-hour practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 164 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a practical skills assessment (50% of final mark)
  • a written assignment including essay (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll go to seminars in language labs based on written and audio texts, workshops and activities, supported by resources on our virtual learning environment (VLE). To choose this module, you need to take General Language Grade 5, usually achieved through a study abroad year.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Get information, ideas and opinions from a variety of simple and complex texts, including some academic texts
  • Through listening, get information, opinions and ideas from a range of simple and complex spoken registers
  • Orally present and discuss topics of interest appropriate to your level, including specialist/academic topics
  • Express yourself with a reasonable degree of accuracy, through a variety of text types making appropriate use of formal and informal registers
Teaching activities
  • 23 x 3-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 131 hours studying independently. This is around 8 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 350-word coursework exercise (25% of final mark)
  • a 10-minute oral assessment and presentation (25% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll go to seminars in language labs based on written and audio texts, workshops and activities, supported by resources on our virtual learning environment (VLE). To choose this module, you need to take General Language Grade 5, usually achieved through a study abroad year.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Get information, ideas and opinions from a variety of simple and complex texts, including some academic texts
  • Through listening, get information, opinions and ideas from a range of simple and complex spoken registers
  • Orally present and discuss topics of interest appropriate to your level, including specialist/academic topics
  • Express yourself with a reasonable degree of accuracy, through a variety of text types making appropriate use of formal and informal registers
Teaching activities
  • 23 x 3-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 131 hours studying independently. This is around 8 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 350-word coursework exercise (25% of final mark)
  • a 10-minute oral assessment and presentation (25% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll compare and contrast contentious interpretations in secondary literature and explore why there have been major shifts in debate since the end of World War II. You'll also look at the origins and nature of the Holocaust and the impact of the Nazi period on German politics and society from 1945.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Analyse the rise of Nazism (fascism)
  • Critically analyse National Socialist ideologies and specific policies
  • Critically compare types of support for and dissent to Nazism
  • Critically debate the contested origins and implementation of the Holocaust
  • Critically apply and discuss different approaches and interpretations in historiography debates about the nature of National Socialism
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 1-hour lectures
  • 12 x 1-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • 2 x 2,000-word written assignments including essay (50% of final mark, each)

What you'll do

Through works such as García Lorca's 'The House of Bernarda Alba' and Polanski's 'Death and the Maiden', you'll examine topics that include legitimacy, gender and class relations, alienation at the modern metropolis, and the impact of political violence and repression in contemporary Spain and Latin America.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Evaluate the social and political impact of literature and film
  • Analyse cultural representations of Hispanic societies
  • Situate cultural representations of Hispanic societies in their national and historical context
  • Communicate ideas effectively, in a manner appropriate to the target audience
  • Use academic and subject specific terminology to present a clearly written discussion of a topic
Teaching activities
  • 2 x 1-hour practical classes and workshops
  • 12 x 1-hour lectures
  • 10 x 1-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 15-minute oral assessment and presentation (30% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word written assignment (70% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll critically evaluate education research in relation to practice observed in the classroom and in your own practice. You'll also demonstrate that you can meet the Teacher's Standards and set personal targets for your professional development.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Critically evaluate an area related to languages pedagogy in detail and depth, showing an awareness and understanding of theoretical perspectives around your chosen area
  • Produce an extensive written report, following the conventions of the presentation of scholarly research
  • Critically reflect on the relevance of the project to your own teaching practice
  • Demonstrate the professional values expected of teachers and your ability to meet required standards in planning, teaching, assessing and learning
  • Demonstrate the required knowledge and understanding of your subject area and the relevant curriculum 
  • Provide evidence that you're able to meet the Teachers' Standards through your teaching practice experience and completion of self-study tasks, supported and guided by your school-based and university-based mentors
Teaching activities
  • 271 hours of work-based learning
  • 9 x 1-hour tutorials
  • 12 x 1-hour seminars
  • 108 hours of practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

n/a

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 4,000-word coursework project (100% of final mark)
  • a coursework portfolio (pass/fail, pass mark of 40)

What you'll do

You'll base the study on your own research, original thought and personal learning on a specialised topic. Your research can take many forms, and involves personal, independent research.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Design an achievable project proposal
  • Make use of current research or equivalent advanced scholarship in the relevant field
  • Use established and relevant techniques of analysis and enquiry in an ethical framework to a specific and focused area relevant to the subject of the project
  • Discuss and analyse assumptions, arguments and data (which may be incomplete) to form a judgement, frame further questions and identify potential solutions
  • Manage and reflect on your own learning and communicate in writing to a specified audience in the academic or workplace community
Teaching activities
  • 5 x 1 hour research workshops
  • project supervision
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 195 hours studying independently. This is around 12 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,000-word written assignment including essay (10% of final mark)
  • a 4,000-word coursework project (90% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll look at the Spanish-American War (1898) to the end of Franco’s rule (1975) and develop key critical thinking and reflective skills.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Explain the causes and consequences of political and social conflict in twentieth century Spain, considering the international dimension of Spanish politics when appropriate
  • Identify the strategies of radical groups and movements, and explain their contribution to political, economic and cultural life in late-nineteenth and twentieth century Spain
  • Evaluate the theoretical perspectives around the study of political and social conflict in twentieth century Spain
  • Analyse the hopes and aspirations of the factions that dominated post-Civil War politics and society in Spain
  • Explain written and visual representations of Spanish reality in the twentieth century
Teaching activities
  • 14 x 1-hour lectures
  • 6 x 1-hour discussion classes
  • 4 hours of poster presentations
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 20-minute oral assessment and presentation (30% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word written assignment (70% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll go to seminars in language labs based on written and audio texts, workshops and activities, supported by resources on our virtual learning environment (VLE). To choose this module, you need to take General Language Grade 5, usually achieved through a study abroad year.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Get information, ideas and opinions from a variety of simple and complex texts, including some academic texts
  • Through listening, get information, opinions and ideas from a range of simple and complex spoken registers
  • Orally present and discuss topics of interest appropriate to your level, including specialist/academic topics
  • Express yourself with a reasonable degree of accuracy, through a variety of text types making appropriate use of formal and informal registers
Teaching activities
  • 23 x 3-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 131 hours studying independently. This is around 8 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 350-word coursework exercise (25% of final mark)
  • a 10-minute oral assessment and presentation (25% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll develop the skills and knowledge to contextualise current affairs in terms of long-term political and social structures, and recurrent themes in French history. You'll also be encouraged to adopt a comparative perspective to evaluate the extent to which France is an exceptional nation, often at odds with her neighbours.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Analyse recent key developments in French politics and society
  • Evaluate the significance of various institutions, organisations and individuals in terms of their relationship with power in France
  • Reflect on the impact of increasing global interdependence on France
  • Communicate ideas in a manner appropriate to the target audience
  • Present a reasoned argument in written form, using appropriate academic/subject specific terminology
Teaching activities
  • 11 x 1-hour lectures
  • 11 x 1-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 178 hours studying independently. This is around 11 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 20-minute oral assessment and presentation (30% of final mark)
  • a 2,500-word written assignment (70% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll also get a theoretical framework to improve your translation skills to a professional level, and take part in group work to simulate working environments. To take this module you'll need a native command of English and grade 5 in a target language or a native command of a second language with a B2 level in English.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Identify and analyse key textual and linguistic features of source text types for translation, and comment on difficulties in the translation process
  • Apply and evaluate theoretical principles of translation strategies
  • Create appropriate translation strategies to communicate the textual and linguistic information of source texts in the target language
  • Use a variety of translation methods to convey the information in a source text
  • Suggest appropriate translation strategies for the key textual and linguistic features of a selected source text type
  • Produce an appropriate and commercially viable translation project
  • Demonstrate the necessary analytical and reflective skills to evaluate your skills
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 1-hour lectures
  • 12 x 1-hour seminars
  • 12 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 250-word coursework exercise (30% of final mark)
  • a 1,000-word coursework essay (30% of final mark)
  • a 1,300-word coursework exercise (40% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll explore key issues in text analysis and translation theories, and produce accurate, readable and usable translations for global cross-cultural communication. To take this module you'll need native command or grade 5 knowledge of Chinese, and native or IELTS 5.5 knowledge of English.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Analyse the purpose, style and structure of source language texts and identify common challenges with a particular text type genre
  • Apply translation methods learned in class to the specific translation problems found in source language texts, and produce accurate, readable and usable translations
  • Critically evaluate translation strategies and conceptualise them in relation to fundamental principles developed in current East and West translation theories
  • Access and use available resources for further independent development in language and translation skills
Teaching activities
  • 23 x 1-hour lectures
  • 24 x 1-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 153 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 40-minute coursework exercise (40% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll learn how legacies of colonialism and imperialism shaped cinematic production in different regions, and  study the impact of the move away from national filmmaking in favour of global funding, distribution and exhibition networks.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Interpret, analyse and explain aesthetic, thematic, political and economic concerns of transnational films and filmmakers
  • Apply key theoretical reading to analysis of films
  • Critically assess how new technologies, production and exhibition contexts impact on national and transnational filmmaking
  • Evaluate the relationship of film to wider geo-political agendas and concerns
  • Critically understand and articulate distribution, marketing and reception of transnational work
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures, tutorials and an online web design workshop.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 163 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a quiz (30% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word assignment (70% of final mark) – in this assignment you'll design a website

What you'll do

You'll also work on your ability to produce these texts, using analytical frameworks to evaluate and adapt them.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Apply theoretical frameworks to critically analyse examples of written professional communication
  • Evaluate and produce examples of professional writing
  • Apply knowledge of rhetoric to deliver a professional presentation
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 1-hour lectures
  • 12 x 1-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 2,500-word written assignment (70% of final mark)
  • a 15-minute group oral assessment and presentation (30% of final mark)

We use the best and most current research and professional practice alongside feedback from our students to make sure course content is relevant to your future career or further studies.

Therefore, some course content may change over time to reflect changes in the discipline or industry and some optional modules may not run every year. If a module doesn’t run, we’ll let you know as soon as possible and help you choose an alternative module.

My degree has given me the confidence to travel and work abroad. I am now in Beijing to complete a MA in European and Asian Affairs.

Jan Chodorowski, BA Hons Modern Languages student

How you're assessed

You’ll be assessed through:

  • essays
  • use of software including desktop publishing, podcasts, subtitling and web design
  • case studies
  • blogging
  • examinations
  • book reviews
  • professional and business reports
  • group and individual projects
  • oral presentations
  • portfolio of achievement

You’ll be able to test your skills and knowledge informally before you do assessments that count towards your final mark.

You can get feedback on all practice and formal assessments so you can improve in the future.

The way you’re assessed may depend on the modules you select. As a guide, students on this course last year were typically assessed as follows:

  • Year 1 students: 23% by written exams, 16% by practical exams and 61% by coursework
  • Year 2 students: 38% by written exams, 7% by practical exams and 55% by coursework
  • Year 3 students: 100% by coursework
  • Year 4 students: 7% by written exams, 3% by practical exams and 90% by coursework

Placement year

After your second year, you’ll take a work or study year in a country where your target languages are spoken. This gives you a worldview and cultural awareness that will help you stand out from other candidates when you begin your career.

We have links with universities and employers in countries and regions such as:

  • Germany
  • Spain
  • China
  • Taiwan
  • Latin America

We also have partnerships with the British Senegalese Institute and development organisations in Dakar, which provide opportunities for work placements in Senegal on your year abroad.

We’ll help you secure a study or work placement that fits your aspirations. You’ll get mentoring and support throughout the year.

Work experience and career planning

To give you the best chance of securing a great job when you graduate, our Careers and Employability service can help you find relevant work experience during your course.

We can help you identify placements, internships, voluntary roles and freelancing opportunities that will complement your studies and build your portfolio.

If you combine your degree with teacher training, you'll do teaching placements as part of your course.

This course allows you to take the Learning From Experience (LiFE) option. This means you can earn credits towards your degree for work, volunteer and research placements that you do alongside your study.

James' story
"I love the fact that I'm doing what I loved at school the most..."

James took his love of languages and decided to a study BA (Hons) Modern Languages degree at uni. Find out what he loves about Portsmouth.

Learning support

As well as support by faculty teaching staff and your personal tutor, you can use the University’s Academic Skills Unit (ASK).

ASK provides one-to-one support in areas such as:

  • academic writing
  • note taking
  • time management
  • critical thinking
  • presentation skills
  • referencing
  • working in groups
  • revision, memory and exam techniques

If you have a disability or need extra support, the Additional Support and Disability Centre (ASDAC) will give you help, support and advice.

Teaching

Teaching methods on this course include:

  • lectures
  • seminars
  • skill development sessions
  • oral practice classes
  • work placement

You can access all teaching resources on Moodle, our virtual learning environment, from anywhere with a Web connection.

How you'll spend your time

One of the main differences between school or college and university is how much control you have over your learning.

At university, as well as spending time in timetabled teaching activities such as lectures, seminars and tutorials, you’ll do lots of independent study with support from our staff when you need it.

We recommend you spend at least 35 hours a week studying for your Modern Languages degree. In your first year, you’ll be in timetabled teaching activities such as lectures, seminars and workshops for about 9 hours a week. The rest of the time you’ll do independent study such as research, reading, coursework and project work, alone or in a group with others from your course. You'll probably do more independent study and have less scheduled teaching in years 2 and 3, but this depends on which modules you choose.

Term times

The academic year runs from September to early June with breaks at Christmas and Easter. It's divided into 2 teaching blocks and 2 assessment periods:

  • September to December – teaching block 1
  • January – assessment period 1
  • January to May – teaching block 2 (includes Easter break)
  • May to June – assessment period 2

Extra learning support

The amount of timetabled teaching you'll get on your degree might be less than what you're used to at school or college, but you'll also get face-to-face support from teaching and support staff when you need it. These include the following people and services:

Personal tutor

Your personal tutor helps you make the transition to independent study and gives you academic and personal support throughout your time at university.

As well as regular scheduled meetings with your personal tutor, they're also available at set times during the week if you want to chat with them about anything that can't wait until your next scheduled meeting.

Learning Development Tutors

You'll have help from a team of faculty Learning Development Tutors. They can help you improve and develop your academic skills and support you in any area of your study.

They can help with:

  • improving your academic writing (for example, essays, reports, dissertations)
  • delivering presentations (including observing and filming presentations)
  • understanding and using assignment feedback
  • managing your time and workload
  • revision and exam techniques

Academic skills support

As well as support from faculty staff and your personal tutor, you can use the University’s Academic Skills Unit (ASK).

ASK provides one-to-one support in areas such as:

  • academic writing
  • note taking
  • time management
  • critical thinking
  • presentation skills
  • referencing
  • working in groups
  • revision, memory and exam techniques

If you have a disability or need extra support, the Additional Support and Disability Centre (ASDAC) will give you help, support and advice.

Library support

Library staff are available in person or by email, phone or online chat to help you make the most of the University’s library resources. You can also request one-to-one appointments and get support from a librarian who specialises in your subject area.

The library is open 24 hours a day, every day, in term time.

Support with English

If English isn't your first language, you can do one of our English language courses to improve your written and spoken English language skills before starting your degree. Once you're here, you can take part in our free English for Academic Purposes programme to improve your English further.

Entry requirements​

BA (Hons) Modern Languages degree entry requirements

Qualifications or experience
  • 96-112 points to include a minimum of 2 A levels, or equivalent. Students wishing to take two languages require 32 points from an A level in a Modern Foreign Language (French, German, Spanish).

See the other qualifications we accept

English language requirements
  • English language proficiency at a minimum of IELTS band 6.0 with no component score below 5.5.

See alternative English language qualifications

If you don't meet the English language requirements yet, you can achieve the level you need by successfully completing a pre-sessional English programme before you start your course.

​Course costs

Tuition fees (2020 start)

  • UK/EU/Channel Islands and Isle of Man students – £9,250 per year (may be subject to annual increase)
  • International students – £14,300 per year (subject to annual increase)

Additional course costs

These course-related costs aren’t included in the tuition fees. So you’ll need to budget for them when you plan your spending.

Additional costs

Our accommodation section shows your accommodation options and highlights how much it costs to live in Portsmouth.

You’ll study up to 6 modules a year. You may have to read several recommended books or textbooks for each module.

You can borrow most of these from the Library. If you buy these, they may cost up to £60 each.

We recommend that you budget £75 a year for photocopying, memory sticks, DVDs and CDs, printing charges, binding and specialist printing.

If your final year includes a major project, there could be cost for transport or accommodation related to your research activities. The amount will depend on the project you choose.

In your third year for your placement abroad, you’ll need to fund the costs of travel, transport and accommodation. The exact costs will depend on the destination. If you're studying at one of our partner universities, you won't need to pay fees at your host institution, but there may be other costs such as visa, insurance or extra tuition. If you choose to work abroad, can help you find an internship, which may be paid or unpaid.  

During your placement year, you’ll be eligible for a discounted rate on your tuition fees. Currently, this discount amounts to 90% of the year’s fees.

The costs associated with your specific destination will be discussed during your second year, as well as possible sources of additional funding.

You’ll have the option to take the Trinity College London Certificate in TESOL, which costs £335.

Apply

How to apply

To start this course in 2020, apply through UCAS. You’ll need:

  • the UCAS course code – R902
  • our institution code – P80

If you’d prefer to apply directly, use our online application form.

You can also sign up to an Open Day to:
  • tour our campus, facilities and halls of residence
  • speak with lecturers and chat with our students 
  • get information about where to live, how to fund your studies and which clubs and societies to join

If you're new to the application process, read our guide on applying for an undergraduate course.

How to apply from outside the UK

If you're from outside of the UK, you can apply for this course through UCAS or apply directly to us (see the 'How to apply' section above for details). You can also get an agent to help with your application. Check your country page for details of agents in your region.

To find out what to include in your application, head to the how to apply page of our international students section. 

If you don't meet the English language requirements for this course yet, you can achieve the level you need by successfully completing a pre-sessional English programme before you start your course.

Admissions terms and conditions

When you accept an offer to study at the University of Portsmouth, you also agree to our terms and conditions as well as the University’s policies, rules and regulations. You should read and consider these before you apply.

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