petroleum engineering student taking measurement
UCAS Code
H850
Mode of Study
Full-time, Full-time sandwich with work placement
Duration
3 years full-time, 4 years sandwich with work placement
Start Date
September 2020
Accredited
Yes

Overview

Major advances in renewable energy are moving forward quickly but the reality is we're likely to depend on oil and gas for many more years to come. If you'd get a kick out of solving problems in this area and want to see the world, this BEng (Hons) Petroleum Engineering degree course is ideal.

You'll get a practical understanding of oil exploration, drilling and extraction, learn how the petroleum industry functions and get to apply your skills in our labs and on field trips.

There's currently a shortage of qualified oil and gas engineers. The skills and industry connections you develop on this course will set you up for a career in the petroleum and engineering sector in areas such as oil and gas exploration, reservoir modelling, product marketing, management and finance.

Accredited by:

This course is accredited by the Energy Institute and the Institution of Mechanical Engineers on behalf of the Engineering Council for the purposes of fully meeting the academic requirement for registration as an Incorporated Engineer and partly meeting the academic requirement for registration as a Chartered Engineer.

97% Graduates in work or further study (DLHE, 2017)

TEF Gold Teaching Excellence Framework

What you'll experience

On this course you'll:

  • Study the phases involved in finding, drilling and extracting oil
  • Apply your skills in our geological and reservoir and drilling labs
  • Use our computer-aided design (CAD) suite, rapid prototyping suite, energy systems lab, petroleum engineering lab, and metrology and 3D scanning microscopy facilities
  • Take your learning out of the lab, with field visits to Stockbridge production facility and Kimmeridge Bay for geological work
  • Take advantage of our status as an active chapter for the Society of Petroleum Engineers with regular industrial talks and an annual event celebrating Petroleum Week
  • Become a student member of the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET) – we pay student membership fees for all of the students on this course
  • Have the chance to expand your experience and make valuable contacts by completing your final-year project with support from the industry professionals and companies

Careers and opportunities

When you finish the course, our Careers and Employability service can help you find a job that puts your skills to work in the industry.

What can you do with a Petroleum Engineering degree?

Previous graduates have gone on to work in many petroleum-related fields, including:

  • oil and gas exploration and production
  • reservoir modelling
  • drilling and refinery operations
  • product marketing
  • manufacturing
  • management
  • finance

What jobs can you do with a Petroleum Engineering degree?

Roles our graduates have taken on include:

  • petroleum engineer
  • reservoir engineer
  • drilling engineer
  • gas engineer

You could also continue you studies as postgraduate level.

After you leave the University, you can get help, advice and support for up to 5 years from our Careers and Employability service as you advance in your career.

What you'll study on this BEng (Hons) Petroleum Engineering degree

Each module on this course is worth a certain number of credits.

In each year, you need to study modules worth a total of 120 credits. For example, 4 modules worth 20 credits and 1 module worth 40 credits.

Year 1

Core modules

What you’ll do

You'll focus on the engineering methods, problem-solving techniques, management skills and economics that make engineers unique. You'll also apply your knowledge to solve complex design challenges.

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Retrieve, plan and write/present documents typically required for employment applications and workplace environments
  • Explain the relevance of engineering and design activities and their interaction with business processes
  • Appreciate competition and the need for leadership, ethics, quality and performance improvement
  • Develop a personal career path plan as part of Professional Development Record and prepare for initial interviews
  • Select and apply processing methods and materials to meet quality, performance, time and cost considerations
  • Apply safe working practice in workshop and laboratory environments
  • Identify the diverse engineering disciplines required for sustainable development projects
Teaching activities
  • 20 x 1-hour practical classes and workshops
  • 20 x 1-hour lectures
  • 8 x 1-hour tutorials
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a practical coursework exercise (50% of final mark) - a set of lab reports based on lab results
  • a coursework exercise (20% of final mark) - a reflective essay on setting goals and career plans
  • a 500-word coursework report (30% of final mark) - a case study based on engineering and design activities and their interaction with business processes

What you'll do

You'll learn technical concepts related to the petroleum system and fluid properties, prospect definition, drilling and completion operations, and reservoir and production engineering. You'll also consider the Health Safety and Environment (HSE) and environmental regulations associated to Oil and Gas industry.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Explain how the oil industry is organised and the main operational activities related to Oil and Gas development
  • Understand the elements of the petroleum system and basic properties of hydrocarbons
  • Understand the basic static and dynamic properties of a reservoir and how to assess them
  • Understand general activities related to drilling, well completion and production operations
  • Explain the fundamentals of reservoir engineering, such as volumetrics, material balance, relative permeability concept, reservoir mechanisms and enhanced oil recovery (EOR)
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the environmental and safety aspects of oil and gas operations
Teaching activities
  • 24 x 2-hour lectures
  • 12 x 1-hour tutorials
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 140 hours studying independently. This is around 8.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,000-word coursework exercise (50% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll focus on basic functions, polynomial equations, trigonometric equations, vector and matrices, differential and integral calculus, and differential and partially differential equations

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Demonstrate your knowledge and understanding of basic functions, polynomial equations, trigonometric equations, vector and matrices, differential and integral calculus, differential and partially differential equations
  • Demonstrate organisational and time-management skills
  • Apply routine mathematical methods
  • Critically analyse and solve mathematical problems applicable to engineering
Teaching activities
  • 23 x 2-hour lectures
  • 23 x 1-hour practical and workshops
  • 23 x 1-hour tutorials
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 108 hours studying independently. This is around 6.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 16-week coursework portfolio (20% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (80% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll focus on topics such as bonding, structure, reactivity, stoichiometry, gas laws, solutions, solubility, and equilibrium. You'll also look at energy relationships, the periodic table, and get an introduction to organic chemistry and hydrocarbons.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Use appropriate units for measurements and carry out simple molar/concentration calculations
  • Describe the principles of atomic and molecular structure, and name and predict the shapes of simple molecules
  • Identify selected functional groups within oil and gas molecules and understand the structure and reactivity of these groups
  • Use your knowledge of the structure and reactivity of functional groups to begin to predict physical and chemical properties of oil and gas
  • Understand material and energy balance in engineering
Teaching activities
  • 22 x 2-hour lectures
  • 12 x 1-hour tutorials
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 144 hours studying independently. This is around 8.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 2,000-word coursework portfolio (50% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll look at their application in petroleum engineering, and learn how to apply your knowledge to engineering scenarios.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Apply the basic concepts of engineering science to applications in stress analysis and dynamics
  • Formulate governing equations for simple mechanics, statics and dynamics problems
  • Apply the principles developed in the module through problem solving and analyse their practical application
  • Apply this knowledge to engineering scenarios and problems
Teaching activities
  • 8 x 1-hour practical classes and workshops
  • 24 x 2-hour lectures
  • 12 x 1-hour tutorials
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 132 hours studying independently. This is around 8 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1-hour exam (50% of final mark)
  • a 1-hour written exam (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll learn to recognise and analyse geometrical elements in geological structures, and use professional software to solve geoscience data analysis tasks. You'll also learn about sequence stratigraphy and the main methods of geophysical data acquisition. 

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Recognise, describe and analyse geometrical elements that make up geological structures
  • Explain the concept of sequence stratigraphy and evaluate its use in the prediction of oil and gas source rocks, seals and reservoir intervals
  • Summarise the use of computational models to reconstruct basin evolution, predict petroleum prospectivity and capture reservoir heterogeneity (diversity)
  • Use 3D modelling software to determine sub-surface aspects of structural geology data
  • Explain the main types of geophysical data acquisition methods and their geoscience applications
  • Solve geoscience data analysis tasks using a range of geological, geophysical and geoinformatic software
Teaching activities
  • 17 x 2-hour lectures
  • 14 x 1-hour tutorials
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,000-word exam (50% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute coursework portfolio (50% of final mark)

Year 2

Core modules

What you’ll do

You'll look at their associated core components and principles of operation. This is followed by detailed discussion, practical analysis and a look at the application of oil and gas wells to onshore and offshore environments.

To choose this module, you need to take the Introduction to Petroleum Engineering and Engineering Principles modules in year 1.

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Explain the various components of an oil/gas well drilling rig and drilling operations
  • Develop a methodology for drill-string and casing design
  • Understand well control based on drilling hydraulics procedures and the American Petroleum Institute (API) recommended practices
  • Carry out the calculations necessary for tasks associated with the drilling rig and well design
  • Evaluate the function of drilling fluids, their preparation, types and lab analysis, simulating practical applications that include measurements of density, viscosity, sand content, filtration rate and alkalinity
Teaching activities
  • 18 x 2-hour lectures
  • 12 x 1-hour tutorials
  • 12 x 1-hour practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 140 hours studying independently. This is around 8.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 30-minute exam (20% of final mark)
  • a 30-minute written exam (20% of final mark)
  • a 2-hour written exam (60% of final mark)

What you’ll do

You'll learn how to make a business plan and consider the risk, cash flows and accounting, and economic aspects of a new business.

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Formulate a business plan for a start-up scenario/entrepreneurship
  • Understand the principles of marketing and their application to the process of starting a business
  • Provide an understanding of the financial performance of a new business in terms of risk, cash flows and accounting and economic indicators
  • Apply business planning models
  • Apply reflective and self-evaluation practices for quality assurance and continues improvement
Teaching activities
  • 10 x 1-hour lectures
  • 10 x 1-hour seminars
  • 10 x 1-hour practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 170 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a coursework report (30% of final mark)
  • an 800-word written assignment including essay (20% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute exam (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll learn how to use professional software and programming, and get an introduction to the analytical and numerical methods for solving equations. 

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Determine and solve the fluid flow equations in porous media based on material balance and Darcy’s law
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the different forms of diffusivity equation for fluids, with different levels of compressibility and different reservoir geometry
  • Understand finite difference and other numerical methods, and their application in solving fluid flow equations
  • Develop experience using commercial software to solve equations via numerical methods and programming
Teaching activities
  • 10 x 2-hour lectures
  • 5 x 2-hour tutorials
  • 3 x 2-hour practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 90-minute written exam (60% of final mark)
  • a 1,500-word coursework exercise (40% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll look at their application in predicting reservoir fluid properties and their thermodynamics in porous media in the production phase.

To choose this module, you need to take the Introduction to Petroleum Engineering and Petroleum Chemistry modules in year 1.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Explain and evaluate the thermodynamic laws and their application in developing phase diagrams and thermocyclers, as well as in the use of thermodynamic tables
  • Analyse the various petroleum reservoir fluid properties and their pressure-volume-temperature (PVT) methods
  • Explain and evaluate the underlying thermodynamic behaviour of petroleum reservoir fluids and their practical applications in the petroleum recovery processes
  • Integrate petroleum fluid PVT properties and thermodynamic behaviour to analyse and implement these tools in the petroleum production and recovery applications, through respective correlations and laws
Teaching activities
  • 17 x 2-hour lectures
  • 10 x 1-hour tutorials
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 156 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1-hour exam (40% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute exam (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll also look at the concepts of well testing and enhanced and/or improved oil recovery operations. To choose this module, you need to take the Introduction to Petroleum Engineering and Earth Science module in Year 1.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Explain the detailed rock properties of petroleum reservoirs and implement them in practical scenarios, through analytical methods, using respective correlations
  • Evaluate the theoretical and practical understanding of underlying concepts in improved/enhanced oil recovery operations, in addition to the well testing procedures
  • Integrate and synthesise petroleum rock and fluid properties and apply them to critically analyse operational mechanisms taking place during oil recovery
Teaching activities
  • 24 x 2-hour lectures
  • 12 x 1-hour tutorials
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 140 hours studying independently. This is around 8.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1-hour exam (40% of final mark)
  • a 1-hour practical skills assessment (30% of final mark)
  • a 1,000-word coursework report (30% of final mark)

Optional modules

What you’ll do

You'll get the opportunity to put your learning from the first two years of the degree into practice, improving your chances of securing a professional level role upon graduation.

You'll be able to apply for ENGTech registration through the IMechE on successful completion of the unit.

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Evaluate your learning, personal development and future career opportunities
  • Describe your tasks and responsibilities held in the course of (self) employment
  • Differentiate your employability as graduates, as a result of the placement experience
Teaching activities
  • 5 x 1-hour seminars
  • 195 hours of placement
Independent study time

N/A

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through a 4,000-word portfolio (100% of final mark).

What you'll do

You'll enter at the appropriate level for your existing language knowledge. If you combine this module with language study in your first or third year, you can turn this module into a certificated course that is aligned with the Common European Framework for Languages (CEFRL).

What you'll learn

When you complete this module:

  • You'll have improved your linguistic skills in Arabic, British Sign Language, Italian, Japanese, Mandarin, French, German or Spanish
  • You'll be prepared for Erasmus study abroad
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through: 

  • coursework (100% of final mark) 

What you'll do

This is where the crude oil from oil fields is converted into products such as natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), gasoline, kerosene, fuel oils and lubricants. You'll get an understanding of the fundamentals of refining processes and their design aspects in terms of suitability, quality, safety and sustainability.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Identify and understand the characteristic properties of crude oil
  • Understand the specifications of petroleum products and their significance
  • Classify based on mechanisms and describe in detail the various refinery processes, including the principle of operation, reaction mechanisms, block/flow diagram, operating conditions and how they connect in the process flow of the refinery
  • Apply the principles explored in the module to analyse and design separation processes and technologies
Teaching activities
  • 18 x 2-hour lectures
  • 12 x 1-hour tutorials
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 2,000-word exam (40% of final mark)
  • a 2-hour written exam (60% of final mark)

Year 3

Core modules

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Understand which logs should be run to obtain necessary petrophysical properties and interpret them to achieve necessary properties
  • Demonstrate how measurements can be obtained through cores and develop an understanding of how they could be used for the calculation of petrophysical properties
  • Perform a ""quick look"" evaluation of a set of logs to evaluate their quality and determine shale content, porosity, water saturation and hydrocarbon type, or determine source of flow, and cement and casing condition, for cased hole logs
  • Understand the application of professional software to data, to achieve meaningful interpretations
  • Demonstrate how different types of logs could be used for unconventional techniques
Teaching activities
  • 18 x 2-hour lectures
  • 12 x 1-hour tutorials
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a coursework portfolio (40% of final mark) – containing  1,500-word group report, and 20-minute presentation
  • a 90-minute exam (60% of final mark)

What you'll do
Your focus will come from an extensive list provided by academic staff, or suggested by yourself. You'll develop planning and self-management techniques, as well as the skills for activities that require a solution, investigation or analysis.
What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Organise, plan and schedule a task showing competency in conducting research, design and/or development
  • Demonstrate project management skills, including the application of time and resources, as well as working with technical uncertainty
  • Conduct a problem-solving activity requiring measures of analysis, synthesis, creativity and decision-making, reflecting the technical skills gained on your course
  • Reflect on the commercial, economic and social context of the project, including ethics in engineering, health and safety, environmental and commercial risk, sustainability and innovation, risk assessment and management
  • Confidently present and communicate information by written report and visual display, orally illustrating your competence in critical evaluation and thinking
Teaching activities
  • 4 x 1-hour lectures
  • 2 x 1-hour seminars
  • 12 hours of project supervision
Independent study

We recommend you spend at least 382 hours studying independently. This is around 11 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 10,000-word dissertation (100% of final mark)

What you'll do

In your coursework you'll model the production system to optimise production using commercial well simulator software. You'll specifically look at hardware components, their functions and importance.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Analyse the fluid flow performance through the reservoir, wellbore, choke and surface production facility
  • Model the reservoir performance using decline curve analysis and forecast the production
  • Evaluate the causes of formation damage, and design appropriate well stimulation technologies
  • Design appropriate artificial lift techniques based upon well construction, rock and fluid properties and inflow characteristics
  • Identify wellbore problems, and recommend appropriate treatments to mitigate effects
  • Model the petroleum production system and optimise production using commercial wellbore simulator software
Teaching activities
  • 18 x 2-hour lectures
  • 12 x 1-hour tutorials
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a coursework exercise (40% of final mark)
  • a 2-hour written exam (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll look at the practical aspects of reservoir engineering and the relationship between numerical and analytical reservoir engineering approaches. 

To choose this module, you need to take the Reservoir Engineering, Mathematics and Petroleum Geoscience modules in years and 2.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Identify and tell the difference between types of single and multiphase flow equations in porous material
  • Critically analyse the practical aspects of reservoir simulation
  • Establish the relationship between numerical and analytical techniques in reservoir engineering
  • Apply reservoir engineering concepts to a software-based reservoir simulation to predict reservoir performance
  • Use reservoir simulation tools to build conceptual models in the computer lab
Teaching activities
  • 18 x 2-hour lectures
  • 12 x 1-hour tutorials
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 2,000-word coursework exercise (40% of final mark)
  • a 2-hour written exam (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll also learn about the technologies and innovations that might lead to improvements in industry.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Identify, calculate and analyse the environmental improvement and economic benefits coming from the application of environmental management tools and methodologies
  • Critically analyse global environmental issues, as well as national and international responses
  • Apply sustainable development principles to the practice of engineering, the improvement of efficiency, and the development and implementation of innovations, to reduce the environmental impact of industrial production and processes
  • Review major environmental consequences arising from human activity, and discuss the responsibilities of technologists with regard to sustainable development and business processes such as competition and the need for leadership, ethics, quality and performance improvement
  • Critically evaluate materials (their selection, use and substitutes) and manufacturing processes for engineering materials, using life cycle analysis
  • Critically analyse, formulate and manage constraints in manufacturing operations due to legislation, hazard and risk
Teaching activities
  • 22 x 1-hour lectures
  • 18 x 1-hour tutorials
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 160 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 2,000-word coursework report (40% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (60% of final mark)

We use the best and most current research and professional practice alongside feedback from our students to make sure course content is relevant to your future career or further studies.

Therefore, some course content may change over time to reflect changes in the discipline or industry and some optional modules may not run every year. If a module doesn’t run, we’ll let you know as soon as possible and help you choose an alternative module.

How you're assessed

You’ll be assessed through:

  • written examinations
  • coursework
  • practical tests
  • project work
  • presentations

You’ll be able to test your skills and knowledge informally before you do assessments that count towards your final mark.

You can get feedback on all practice and formal assessments so you can improve in the future.

The way you’re assessed may depend on the modules you select. As a guide, students on this course last year were typically assessed as follows:

  • Year 1 students: 84% by written exams, 8% by practical exams and 8% by coursework
  • Year 2 students: 68% by written exams and 32% by coursework
  • Year 3 students: 43% by written exams and 57% by coursework

Work experience and career planning

To give you the best chance of securing a great job when you graduate, our Careers and Employability service can help you find relevant work experience during your course.

We can help you identify placements, internships, voluntary opportunities that will complement your studies and build your CV.

Teaching

Teaching methods on this course include:

  • lectures
  • seminars
  • tutorials (personal and academic)
  • laboratory
  • project work
  • computer-aided-engineering system activity
  • open access study

You can access all teaching resources on Moodle, our virtual learning environment, from anywhere with a Web connection.

How you'll spend your time

One of the main differences between school or college and university is how much control you have over your learning.

At university, as well as spending time in timetabled teaching activities such as lectures, seminars and tutorials, you’ll do lots of independent study with support from our staff when you need it.

A typical week

We recommend you spend at least 35 hours a week studying for your BEng (Hons) Petroleum Engineering degree. In your first year, you’ll be in timetabled teaching activities such as lectures, tutorials, practical classes and workshops for about 16 hours a week. The rest of the time you’ll do independent study such as research, reading, coursework and project work, alone or in a group with others from your course. You'll probably do more independent study and have less scheduled teaching in years 2 and 3, but this depends on which modules you choose.

Most timetabled teaching takes place during the day, Monday to Friday. Optional field trips may involve evening and weekend teaching or events. There’s usually no teaching on Wednesday afternoons.

Term times

The academic year runs from September to early June with breaks at Christmas and Easter. It's divided into 2 teaching blocks and 2 assessment periods:

  • September to December – teaching block 1
  • January – assessment period 1
  • January to May – teaching block 2 (includes Easter break)
  • May to June – assessment period 2

Extra learning support

The amount of timetabled teaching you'll get on your degree might be less than what you're used to at school or college, but you'll also get face-to-face support from teaching and support staff when you need it. These include the following people and services:

Personal tutor

Your personal tutor helps you make the transition to independent study and gives you academic and personal support throughout your time at university.

As well as regular scheduled meetings with your personal tutor, they're also available at set times during the week if you want to chat with them about anything that can't wait until your next meeting.

Learning support tutors

You'll have help from a team of faculty learning support tutors. They can help you improve and develop your academic skills and support you in any area of your study in one-on-one and group sessions.

They can help you:

  • master the mathematics skills you need to excel on your course
  • understand engineering principles and how to apply them in any engineering discipline
  • solve computing problems relevant to your course
  • develop your knowledge of computer programming concepts and methods relevant to your course
  • understand and use assignment feedback

Laboratory support

All our labs and practical spaces are staffed by qualified laboratory support staff. They’ll support you in scheduled lab sessions and can give you one-to-one help when you do practical research projects.

Academic skills support

As well as support from faculty staff and your personal tutor, you can use the University’s Academic Skills Unit (ASK).

ASK provides one-to-one support in areas such as:

  • academic writing
  • note taking
  • time management
  • critical thinking
  • presentation skills
  • referencing
  • working in groups
  • revision, memory and exam techniques

If you have a disability or need extra support, the Additional Support and Disability Centre (ASDAC) will give you help, support and advice.

Library support

Library staff are available in person or by email, phone or online chat to help you make the most of the University’s library resources. You can also request one-to-one appointments and get support from a librarian who specialises in your subject area.

The library is open 24 hours a day, every day, in term time.

Support with English

If English isn't your first language, you can do one of our English language courses to improve your written and spoken English language skills before starting your degree. Once you're here, you can take part in our free English for Academic Purposes programme to improve your English further.

Maths and stats support

The Maths Cafe offers advice and assistance with mathematical skills in a friendly, informal environment. You can come to our daily drop-in sessions, develop your maths skills at a workshop or use our online resources.

Entry requirements​

BEng (Hons) Petroleum Engineering degree entry requirements

Qualifications or experience
  • 96-120 points to include a minimum of 2 A levels, or equivalent, with a minimum of 40 points from Mathematics, plus one relevant subject.

See the other qualifications we accept

English language requirements
  • English language proficiency at a minimum of IELTS band 6.0 with no component score below 5.5.

See alternative English language qualifications

​Course costs

Tuition fees (2020 start)

  • UK/EU/Channel Islands and Isle of Man students – £9,250 per year (may be subject to annual increase)
  • International students – £15,900 per year (subject to annual increase)

Additional course costs

These course-related costs aren’t included in the tuition fees. So you’ll need to budget for them when you plan your spending.

Additional costs

Our accommodation section shows your accommodation options and highlights how much it costs to live in Portsmouth.

You’ll study up to 6 modules a year. You may have to read several recommended books or textbooks for each module.

You can borrow most of these from the Library. If you buy these, they may cost up to £60 each.

We recommend that you budget £75 a year for photocopying, memory sticks, DVDs and CDs, printing charges, binding and specialist printing.

If your final year includes a major project, there could be cost for transport or accommodation related to your research activities. The amount will depend on the project you choose.

You’ll need to pay additional costs of £50–£1000 to cover travel, accommodation or subsistence if you take a placement abroad. The amount you’ll pay will vary, depending on the location and length of your stay.

Apply

How to apply

To start this course in 2020, apply through UCAS. You’ll need:

  • the UCAS course code – H850
  • our institution code – P80

If you’d prefer to apply directly, use our online application form.

You can start your application now and submit it later if you want.

You can also sign up to an Open Day to:

  • tour our campus, facilities and halls of residence
  • speak with lecturers and chat with our students 
  • get information about where to live, how to fund your studies and which clubs and societies to join

If you're new to the application process, read our guide on applying for an undergraduate course.

How to apply from outside the UK

If you're from outside of the UK, you can apply for this course through UCAS or apply directly to us (see the 'How to apply' section above for details). You can also get an agent to help with your application. Check your country page for details of agents in your region.

To find out what to include in your application, head to the how to apply page of our international students section. 

If you don't meet the English language requirements for this course yet, you can achieve the level you need by successfully completing a pre-sessional English programme before you start your course.

Admissions terms and conditions

When you accept an offer to study at the University of Portsmouth, you also agree to our terms and conditions as well as the University’s policies, rules and regulations. You should read and consider these before you apply.

This site uses cookies. Click here to view our cookie policy message.

Accept and close