creative media technologies virtual reality
UCAS Code
P3P1
Mode of Study
Full-time, Full-time sandwich with work placement
Duration
3 years full-time, 4 years sandwich with work placement
Start Date
September 2020

Overview

If you’re bursting with creative ideas and want to inject them into a career in media, this degree gives you the skills that will bring your ideas to life.

On this BSc (Hons) Creative Media Technologies degree course, you’ll develop the abilities you need to create engaging content across all types of media. You’ll get to know your way around professional software packages and emerge ready to take on ambitious content projects in fields such as web development, content marketing, TV production and animation. 

93.3% Graduates in work or further study (DLHE, 2017)

90% Overall student satisfaction (NSS, 2018)

TEF Gold Teaching Excellence Framework

What you'll experience

On this Creative Media Technologies degree course, you'll:

  • Get to grips with the software and packages you’ll use in your creative career, including Photoshop, Illustrator and Avid and Animate
  • Learn from experts with bags of experience in the industry
  • Enjoy a varied curriculum – you’ll get to create videos, craft animations, code games, build websites and develop mobile and virtual reality (VR) applications
  • Use our facilities, packed with the latest tech, including a VR lab, motion capture suite and green screening studio
  • Tailor your degree to meet your interests and workplace ambitions
  • Build a professional portfolio of your work
  • Work on projects with real clients

Careers and opportunities

What can you do with a Creative Media Technologies degree?

You’ll graduate with an understanding of a range of creative digital tools that will open the door to jobs across almost every creative field including:

  • web development
  • animation
  • video production
  • gaming
  • music production
  • TV production

What jobs can you do with a Creative Media Technologies degree?

Roles previous students on this course have taken on include:

  • computer games animator
  • 3D modeller
  • web designer
  • graphics artist
  • video film-maker
  • broadcast journalist
  • games developer
  • musical technician

Many graduates have also gone on to form their own web design, event management, and video production companies or have built successful freelance careers.

Our Careers and Employability will support you in finding a role or setting up a business. You'll get help and support for up to 5 years after you leave the University.

What you'll study on this BSc (Hons) Creative Media Technologies degree

Each module on this course is worth a certain number of credits.

In each year, you need to study modules worth a total of 120 credits. For example, 4 modules worth 20 credits and 1 module worth 40 credits.

Year 1

Core modules

What you’ll do

You'll develop your understanding of the digital culture we live in and the impact this has on the cultural and creative industries.

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Understand and evaluate key principles and concepts in the field of digital culture
  • Identify and explore the opportunities and challenges of a digital economy
  • Identify and assess how digital technology changes the cultural and creative industries
  • Evaluate the skills you need for a career in the cultural and creative industries and identify how to improve and enhance your personal weaknesses
  • Research and plan how to achieve career goals and evaluate your progress
Teaching activities
  • 11 x 1-hour lectures
  • 11 x 1-hour tutorials
  • 4 x 1-hour seminars
  • 10 x 1-hour practical workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 164 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,500-word essay (50% of final mark)
  • a portfolio (50% of final mark)

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Analyse, interpret and extend a brief, using animation
  • Use appropriate software to produce basic computer animations
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend seminars, lectures and tutorials.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9.2 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through coursework (100% of final mark) – 2 x portfolios.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Explain the fundamental concepts of computer graphics
  • Describe the fundamental concepts of human vision and colour
  • Explain the theories and techniques involved in the storage, representation and manipulation of digital images
  • Discuss the applications of computer graphics
  • Create visual assets using industry-standard graphics packages for bitmap graphics (2D and 3D), 2D animation and compositing
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures and classes.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 155 hours studying independently. This is around 4.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1-hour examination (50% of final mark)
  • a portfolio (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll learn sound design, music composition, recording and audio editing techniques, and develop skills relevant to key professional roles in related industries.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Create appropriate original sound or music to accompany moving image, informed by relevant theory and analysis of existing techniques and works
  • Record, edit, arrange and mix the various soundtrack elements for visual media
  • Investigate and review the relationships between visual imagery and sound within a chosen context, with references to relevant theory, examples and aesthetic considerations
  • Assess, reflect upon and evaluate the success of both the process and the end result
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend practical classes and lectures.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 162 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through coursework (100% of final mark).

What you'll do

You'll develop the skills and understanding to develop simple websites, using current web standards. You'll also learn how to plan, shoot and edit video and deploy footage on web platforms.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Describe the basic processes of video production practices
  • Understand the language of film and video production
  • Apply the basic principles of video production to create a video artefact
  • Encode a video artefact appropriately for publishing on the web
  • Create web interfaces using HTML, CSS and scripting
  • Apply graphic design principles to web developments
  • Recognise and describe the key concepts and standards that apply to web and video technologies, and the legal and health and safety contexts in which they operate
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures and practical classes.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 330 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • 2 x projects (75% of final mark)
  • a 1-hour examination (25% of final mark)

Year 2

Optional modules

What you'll do

You'll take this optional module as part of the second year of your course.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Manage and complete tasks in an overseas study environment relevant to your course, with an appropriate level of skill, independence and performance
  • Reflect on your personal development and how your employability prospects have been enhanced by the exchange
Teaching activities

N/A

Independent study time

N/A

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through a 2,000-word report (100% of final mark).

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Work independently with less need for supervision and direction
  • Communicate a detailed knowledge of the contexts of business and industry-specific practices relevant to your chosen field
  • Demonstrate awareness of ideas, contexts and frameworks within self-employment, freelancing or business start-ups
  • Develop professional working relationships within industry/business disciplines
  • Proactively evaluate your strengths and weaknesses, and develop your own criteria and judgement relating to your business practice, future learning and future employability goals
Teaching activities

N/A

Independent study time

N/A

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through a portfolio (100% of final mark).

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Work independently with less need for supervision and direction
  • Communicate a detailed knowledge of the contexts of business and industry-specific practices relevant to your chosen field
  • Demonstrate awareness of ideas, contexts and frameworks within your chosen area of employment
  • Develop professional working relationships within industry/business disciplines
  • Proactively evaluate your strengths and weaknesses, and develop your own criteria and judgement relating to your business practice, future learning and future employability goals
Teaching activities

N/A

Independent study time

N/A

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through a portfolio (100% of final mark).

What you'll do

On this module, you'll explore the CGI Lighting and Look Development skills related to the role of the Lighting Technical Director.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Create efficient visual effect pipelines between various commercial CGI applications
  • Develop artistic and cinematic aesthetics in your work, using appropriate technological solutions
  • Articulate, analyse and reflect upon your work using the languages of art/cinema and maths/science
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend practical classes and supervised workshops.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a portfolio (50% of final mark)
  • a Powerpoint exploring your artistic design process (25% of final mark)
  • a Powerpoint exploring your technical design process (25% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll develop creative coding skills and explore topics such as algorithmic art, video, animation, sound, music, lyrics, poems or literature.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Generate creative ideas and express them algorithmically
  • Conceive, plan and create an original creative coding artefact
  • Apply programming concepts to creative ideas, demonstrating an understanding of coding principles and practice
  • Demonstrate research-informed practice
  • Critically reflect upon and evaluate the success of your project
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures, practical classes and tutorials.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 160 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through coursework (100% of final mark).

What you'll do

You'll plan, research and implement a personal creative identity to use online. You'll develop skills in industry research, online campaign pitches, social media, branding and digital promotion.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of appropriate online platforms for showcasing your creative work in the digital media industries
  • Recognise and discuss the social media landscape and how you can use this to to promote yourself effectively
  • Design and implement a personal branding campaign that uses and promotes your skillset
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend tutorials and lectures.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 170 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through a portfolio (100% of final mark).

What you'll do

You'll examine the underpinning digital audio theory behind common sound manipulation techniques, creating and manipulating sound through synthesis tools, effects and algorithmic composition.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Conceive, plan and design an original, interactive sound application
  • Use established audio techniques to trigger, generate and manipulate audio
  • Practically demonstrate an understanding of digital audio and sound design concepts through composition and supporting notes
  • Critically place your work into a wider musical context and evaluate the success of your application
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures, tutorials and practical classes.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 160 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,500-word report (30% of final mark)
  • a software artefact (70% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll do this by engaging in interdisciplinary work, developing an appreciation of other creative disciplines and understanding how professionals collaborate.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Demonstrate independent, analytical and creative attributes
  • Demonstrate the ability to be an effective team player, able to provide leadership and to support the success of others
  • Communicate clearly and effectively using various methods and to different audiences
Teaching activities

On this module you'll work independently and in groups with regular tutorial support, and also attend some briefings and lectures.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a group presentation (40% of final mark)
  • an individual portfolio (40% of final mark)
  • a 1,000-word report (20% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll examine good and bad designs from a theoretical, methodological and practical perspective. You'll focus on psychologically orientated, user-driven design and see how applying research enhances practical design.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Critically evaluate existing interactive content experiences across a range of delivery platforms
  • Examine methods used in interaction design and critically assess the appropriateness of different interaction design methods
  • Recognise how the sensory, cognitive and physical capabilities of users inform the design of interactive experiences
  • Apply findings from research in a practical context
  • Create an interaction design concept for a specific problem and context, using creative design, ideation, prototyping and evaluation techniques
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend seminars and practical classes.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 164 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • 2 x 2,000-word coursework exercise (50% of final mark, each)

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Use appropriate equipment and techniques to develop a video-based project, using the relevant health and safety policies and procedures
  • Collaborate effectively with group members and contribute to team projects
  • Use time management skills to complete tasks within allotted schedules
  • Demonstrate a reflective understanding of the interrelation of theory and practice within your own work, and the work of other practitioners
  • Demonstrate advanced audio-visual literacy and camera skills
  • Use post-production skills to inform your appreciation of film and video
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures, seminars and practical classes.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 160 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through coursework (100% of final mark).

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Use appropriate equipment and techniques to develop a video-based project, using the relevant health and safety policies and procedures
  • Collaborate effectively with group members and contribute to team projects
  • Use time management skills to complete tasks within allotted schedules
  • Demonstrate a reflective understanding of the interrelation of theory and practice within your own work and the work of other practitioners
  • Demonstrate an understanding of film grammar and narrative
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures, seminars and practical classes.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 156 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through coursework (100% of final mark).

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Identify future career goals and reflect on these to develop a personal development plan (programme of learning), which includes suitable work experience and skills/knowledge development opportunities
  • Arrange suitable work experience, engage with personal development opportunities and analyse relevant literature relating to enhancing your employment opportunities
  • Critically evaluate and articulate your learning (knowledge, skills and attributes) in relation to your future career goals
Teaching activities

On this module you'll take part in work-based learning and attend lectures.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 188 hours doing work-based learning or studying independently. This is around 11 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,000-word report (20% of final mark)
  • a 3,000-word report (80% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll learn skills in areas such as composition, re-sequencing, re-orchestration, switching, transitions, testing, mixing and system optimisation.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Design immersive and interactive soundscapes incorporating analysis of games and their required audio assets
  • Create audio assets for game soundscapes using recording, synthesis and sound manipulation techniques as appropriate
  • Compose adaptive music for games with consideration for non-linear interaction
  • Integrate original sound and music assets using game audio middleware to realise interactive soundscapes and adaptive music that respond to gameplay
  • Apply mixing techniques to blend and balance sound and music assets with consideration for non-linear interaction
  • Test audio performance and apply optimisation techniques to ensure audio playback stays within allocated system resources
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures, practical classes, supervised workshop an project supervision meetings.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through coursework (100% of final mark).

What you'll do

You'll form a small group (typically with 4 other students) and work through areas such as designing, manufacturing and pitching ideas. The knowledge and skill you will get through this module will help you to run your own business, but are also transferable skills you can use in many other careers.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Critically reflect on your effectiveness at tasks that use employability skills such as project planning, communication, time management, leadership and teamwork
  • Evaluate the theory and complete the practice of establishing and running a business enterprise
  • Understand the systems commonly used to plan, record and monitor business decisions and company transactions
  • Critically reflect on the factors that contribute towards the success or failure of business start ups
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently (including group work). This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through: 

  • a 2,000 word report (50% of your final mark)
  • an oral assessment and presentation (50% of your final mark)

What you'll do

You'll choose a VR application area to investigate in depth, and apply the knowledge and skills you learn to a small VR project.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Compare and contrast VR applications and discuss their potential uses and limitations
  • Review an area of VR application or research, exploring the main ideas and technologies, and evaluating current approaches and theories
  • Evaluate approaches to designing and planning a VR application
  • Follow an appropriate methodology for designing a VR application
  • Implement a VR project using appropriate hardware and software, including user documentation
  • Evaluate approaches to application testing and perform structured testing as part of an iterative development cycle
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures and practical classes.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 156 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through

  • a coursework report (20% of final mark) – a reflective report, documenting 5 practical VR mini-assignments
  • a 2,500-word report (30% of final mark) – a technical/literature review and formal specification, design and planning document
  • an applied virtual reality artefact (50% of final mark) – with supporting documentation

Year 3

Core modules

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Initiate and manage an individual practice and/or creative and/or research project appropriate for your programme of study
  • Conduct a scholarly review of existing work in your selected domain together with an account of your own work
  • Demonstrate and justify the choices you make, and approaches you take, to the solution of the project's problem/domain
  • Communicate the outcomes of your project activities in a professional and scholarly manner
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures and project supervision meetings.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 185 hours studying independently. This is around 11 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 15-minute presentation (10% of final mark)
  • a 4,500-word dissertation (90% of final mark)

What you'll do

It focuses on academic models, as well as approaches to and results of the study of games from an analytical, cultural and design perspective.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Discuss and critically analyse historical and contemporary games research and its implications
  • Contextually and critically analyse games according to different games research models and approaches
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures and seminars.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 165 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through a 3,000-word exercise (100% of final mark).

What you'll do

This includes developing systems and content that responds to real-time data (including user input, player and object states, game and physics engine data).

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Design and develop non-linear audio systems with accompanying media assets (music and sound) for interactive media and computer games
  • Build systems using visual programming and scripting
  • Produce a reactive or interactive artefact that utilises game engine and audio system programming and design technologies
  • Work professionally when developing and implementing audio systems
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures, practical classes and tutorials.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 164 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a portfolio (40% of final mark)
  • project output (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll do research using a variety of resources and communicate with industry professionals.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Analyse and identify strategies and opportunities for ongoing personal and professional development
  • Evaluate industry relationships with technology and social cultural 'change' and understand the importance of this in terms of individual enterprise
  • Produce a portfolio of contemporary and innovative professional practice, relating to current and emerging industry requirements
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures and tutorials.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 154 hours studying independently. This is around 4.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,000-word report (25% of final mark)
  • project output (25% of final mark)
  • a 10-minute presentation (50% of final mark)

Optional modules

What you'll do

The tasks you'll cover relate to the role of an effects animator or effects technical director in the VFX industry.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Demonstrate practical solutions to real problems using appropriate visual effect techniques
  • Apply different types of physics simulations, and procedural dynamic effects
  • Analyse and reflect on a library of reference works and observations, articulating how their research has informed and progressed the development of flexible pipelines and software interoperability
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend tutorials and workshops.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 167 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through a portfolio (70% of final mark).

What you'll do

You'll choose a VR application area to investigate in more depth, and apply the knowledge and skills you learn to develop a small VR project.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Compare and contrast VR applications and discuss their potential uses and current limitations
  • Critically review an area of VR application or research, exploring the main ideas and technologies and evaluating current approaches and theories
  • Evaluate approaches to design and planning, and demonstrate the ability to follow an appropriate methodology for designing a VR application
  • Demonstrate the ability to implement a VR project using appropriate hardware and software, including user documentation
  • Critically evaluate approaches to application testing, and perform structured testing as part of an iterative development cycle
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures and practical classes.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 140 hours studying independently. This is around 8.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a reflective report (20% of final mark) – documenting 5 practical VR mini-assignments
  • a 2,500-word report (30% of final mark) – technical/literature review and formal specification, design and planning document
  • an applied VR artefact (50% of final mark) – with supporting document

What you'll do

You'll learn how to use design principles to develop interfaces for digital artefacts.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Analyse, interpret and extend a brief
  • Demonstrate application of universal design rules
  • Apply relevant narrative style to a design
  • Employ typographic and readability rules
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures and practical classes.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 178 hours studying independently. This is around 11 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 20-minute presentation (20% of final mark)
  • a portfolio (80% of final mark)

What you'll learn
When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:
  • Demonstrate an understanding of appropriate apps and online platforms for developing a showcase of photographs
  • Evaluate the quality and effectiveness of your work using reflective reviews and evaluation (in the form of a blog)
  • Design and implement a photographic campaign using relevant social media platforms and apps
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures and tutorials.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 170 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through a portfolio (100% of final mark).

What you'll do

You'll learn how to produce demanding factual narrative film and video work, leading to the completion of projects you can use for showreel/portfolio purposes. You'll get extra guidance regarding ethical filmmaking, risk assessment and technique.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Analyse concepts of realism and address problems of recording and representing reality in moving image media
  • Assemble, organise and structure complex documentary narratives that challenge your audience's perception of the subject matter
  • Produce a comprehensive video artefact that demonstrates a contextual understanding of the medium
  • Critically examine – with reference to key documentary theory and film makers – the influence of historical, economical and technological developments in the medium of documentary film making
Teaching activities

On this module, you'll attend lectures, seminars and workshops.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 164 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 2,500-word essay (40% of final mark)
  • a 10-minute video documentary (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

This is self-directed unit allowing the widest scope for your investigations and the unit lecturer will help to guide and support you in your project.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Analyse current trends and future developments in digital technologies
  • Evaluate the transformative potential and the impacts of new technological developments, including legal and ethical issues
  • Propose and develop solutions to problems using the latest technologies
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures and seminars. The seminars are based on your participation in discussing the lecture topic or topics that you've researched yourself.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through a coursework project or report (100% of final mark) – a physical project or a report analysing an area of technological development.

What you'll do

You'll explore this through the use of the CCI Motion Capture Suite and industry-standard software.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Appraise theoretical and practical aspects of performance capture technology to understand the character animation production process
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the technical aspects of 3D character animation and performance capture technology
  • Demonstrate the ability to apply the appropriate judgement and techniques needed to ensure that the fidelity of an actor's performance is preserved, from capture to data delivery as effectively as possible
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend a combination of workshops and practical classes.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 4.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through coursework (100% of final mark).

We use the best and most current research and professional practice alongside feedback from our students to make sure course content is relevant to your future career or further studies.

Therefore, some course content may change over time to reflect changes in the discipline or industry and some optional modules may not run every year. If a module doesn’t run, we’ll let you know as soon as possible and help you choose an alternative module.

How you're assessed

You’ll be assessed through:

  • practical projects
  • working journals
  • academic and evaluative essays
  • performances
  • oral presentations
  • examinations
  • case studies

You’ll be able to test your skills and knowledge informally before you do assessments that count towards your final mark.

You can get feedback on all practice and formal assessments so you can improve in the future.

The way you’re assessed may depend on the modules you select. As a guide, students on this course last year were typically assessed as follows:

  • Year 1 students: 17% by written exams, 17% by practical exams and 66% by coursework
  • Year 2 students: 24% by practical exams and 76% by coursework
  • Year 3 students: 7% by written exams, 7% by practical exams and 76% by coursework

Placement year

After your second year of study, you can do an optional placement year in the UK or overseas. You’ll get experience of working in the industry and use the skills you've learnt so far on the course.

Previous students have taken placements as multimedia designers and graphic artists at agencies and organisations including BluePrint Media in London and Toby’s Art in Salisbury.

Interested in running your own business on your placement year instead? You can start up and run your own company for a year as an alternative to a work-based placement. You'll work with fellow students to build and launch a successful venture.

However you spend your year, we’ll give you plenty of support and mentoring to make sure you’re getting the most out of your placement.

Work experience and career planning

To give you the best chance of securing a great job when you graduate, our Careers and Employability service can help you find relevant work experience during your course.

We can help you identify placements, internships, voluntary roles and freelancing opportunities that will complement your studies and build your portfolio.

Teaching

Teaching methods on this course include:

  • lectures
  • workshops
  • seminars
  • one-on-one tutorials

You'll practice skills in small groups, to make sure you're getting the development you need. There's an emphasis on group work, to mirror what it'll be like in your future career.

You can access all teaching resources on Moodle, our virtual learning environment, from anywhere with a Web connection.

How you'll spend your time

One of the main differences between school or college and university is how much control you have over your learning.

At university, as well as spending time in timetabled teaching activities such as lectures, seminars and tutorials, you’ll do lots of independent study with support from our staff when you need it. 

A typical week

We recommend you spend at least 35 hours a week studying for your Creative Media Technologies degree. In your first year, you’ll be in timetabled teaching activities such as lectures, tutorials, seminars, practical classes, workshops and supervised studio sessions for about 10 hours a week. The rest of the time you’ll do independent study such as research, reading, coursework and project work, alone or in a group with others from your course. You'll probably do more independent study and have less scheduled teaching in years 2 and 3, but this depends on which modules you choose.

Most timetabled teaching takes place during the day, Monday to Friday. You may occasionally need to go to University and course events in the evenings and at weekends. There’s usually no teaching on Wednesday afternoons.

Term times

The academic year runs from September to early June with breaks at Christmas and Easter. It's divided into 2 teaching blocks and 2 assessment periods:

  • September to December – teaching block 1
  • January – assessment period 1
  • January to May – teaching block 2 (includes Easter break)
  • May to June – assessment period 2

Extra learning support

The amount of timetabled teaching you'll get on your degree might be less than what you're used to at school or college, but you'll also get face-to-face support from teaching and support staff when you need it. These include the following people and services:

Personal tutor

Your personal tutor helps you make the transition to independent study and gives you academic and personal support throughout your time at university.

You’ll have regular contact with your personal tutor in learning activities or scheduled meetings. You can also make an appointment with them if you need extra support.

Student support advisor

In addition to the support you get from your personal tutor, you’ll also have access to a Faculty student support advisor. They can give you confidential, impartial advice on anything to do with your studies and personal wellbeing and refer you to specialist support services.

Academic skills tutors

You'll have help from a team of faculty academic skills tutors. They can help you improve and develop your academic skills and support you in any area of your study.

They can help with:

  • improving your academic writing (for example, essays, reports, dissertations)
  • delivering presentations (including observing and filming presentations)
  • understanding and using assignment feedback
  • managing your time and workload
  • revision and exam techniques

Creative skills tutors

If you need support with software and equipment or you want to learn additional skills (including skills not covered on your course), our creative skills tutors provide free workshops, activities and one-on-one tutorials. Skills you can learn include life drawing, film camera operation and video production.

IT and computing support

Computing support staff are always available to give technical support in the Faculty's computer suites during normal working hours. There's also some support available from 5pm to midnight at busy times of the year.

Academic skills support

As well as support from faculty staff and your personal tutor, you can use the University’s Academic Skills Unit (ASK).

ASK provides one-to-one support in areas such as:

  • academic writing
  • note taking
  • time management
  • critical thinking
  • presentation skills
  • referencing
  • working in groups
  • revision, memory and exam techniques

If you have a disability or need extra support, the Additional Support and Disability Centre (ASDAC) will give you help, support and advice.

Library support

Library staff are available in person or by email, phone or online chat to help you make the most of the University’s library resources. You can also request one-to-one appointments and get support from a librarian who specialises in your subject area.

The library is open 24 hours a day, every day, in term time.

Support with English

If English isn't your first language, you can do one of our English language courses to improve your written and spoken English language skills before starting your degree. Once you're here, you can take part in our free English for Academic Purposes programme to improve your English further.

Entry requirements​

BSc (Hons) Creative Media Technologies degree entry requirements

Qualifications or experience
  • 112 points to include a minimum of 2 A levels, or equivalent.

See the other qualifications we accept

English language requirements
  • English language proficiency at a minimum of IELTS band 6.0 with no component score below 5.5.

See alternative English language qualifications

If you don't meet the English language requirements yet, you can achieve the level you need by successfully completing a pre-sessional English programme before you start your course.

​Course costs

Tuition fees (2020 start)

  • UK/EU/Channel Islands and Isle of Man students – £9,250 per year (may be subject to annual increase)
  • International students – £15,100 per year (subject to annual increase)

Additional course costs

These course-related costs aren’t included in the tuition fees. So you’ll need to budget for them when you plan your spending.

Additional costs

Our accommodation section shows your accommodation options and highlights how much it costs to live in Portsmouth.

You’ll study up to 6 modules a year. You may have to read several recommended books or textbooks for each module.

You can borrow most of these from the Library. If you buy these, they may cost up to £60 each.

We recommend that you budget £75 a year for photocopying, memory sticks, DVDs and CDs, printing charges, binding and specialist printing.

If your final year includes a major project, there could be cost for transport or accommodation related to your research activities. The amount will depend on the project you choose.

If you take the Student Enterprise Module, you’ll need to pay an additional cost of approximately £20.

You'll need access to a digital camera for one of the optional units.

You may need to contribute up to £20 towards occasional coach trips.

Apply

How to apply

To start this course in 2020, apply through UCAS. You’ll need:

  • the UCAS course code – P3P1
  • our institution code – P80

If you’d prefer to apply directly, use our online application form.

You can start your application now and submit it later if you want.

You can also sign up to an Open Day to:

  • tour our campus, facilities and halls of residence
  • speak with lecturers and chat with our students 
  • get information about where to live, how to fund your studies and which clubs and societies to join

If you're new to the application process, read our guide on applying for an undergraduate course.

How to apply from outside the UK

If you're from outside of the UK, you can apply for this course through UCAS or apply directly to us (see the 'How to apply' section above for details). You can also get an agent to help with your application. Check your country page for details of agents in your region.

To find out what to include in your application, head to the how to apply page of our international students section. 

If you don't meet the English language requirements for this course yet, you can achieve the level you need by successfully completing a pre-sessional English programme before you start your course.

Admissions terms and conditions

When you accept an offer to study at the University of Portsmouth, you also agree to our terms and conditions as well as the University’s policies, rules and regulations. You should read and consider these before you apply.

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